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52ancestors-2015

Amy Johnson Crow, of No Story Too Small continues the challenge to the geneablogging world to write a blog post weekly on one ancestor. This could be a photo, a story, biography, or a post on the weekly theme. To read her challenge please go to Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. Feel free to join in at any time!

Although the prompt for this week’s 52 Ancestors post is “So Far Away” and as Amy Johnson Crowe explains: “Which ancestor is the farthest from you, either in distance or in time/generations? Which ancestor have you had to go the farthest away to research?” – I have a different take on that. Some ancestors have been born in Germany or Great Britain, but I’m going to write about how close of a kinship I have with an ancestor who is by general standards several generations removed.

One of the definitions that Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary gives for generation is: “the average span of time between the birth of parents and that of their offspring.” YourDictionary.com explains the “average time” as a “period of around thirty years”. Taking that span of time in to consideration, if a couple – born in 1900 – has a child between ages 25-30 years old, when that child is 30, the parents will be 55-60 years old. If the pattern continues, that couple’s grandchildren will be born when they are 85-90. That is only 3 generations born from 1900-1990.

However, looking at statistics in my family tree database from the early 19th century forward parents were between 18-26 when their first child was born making the generation from grandparent to grandchild 36-40 years with very little deviance. That is until it came to my paternal side.

This is how the Amore side of my family stacks up: my dad was 40 years old when I was born. So instead of the average of about 20 years between generations, there was two times that. My dad’s oldest sister was 18 when he was born so there was almost a full generation between him (as the baby of his family) and his sister. His father was a little more than 39 years old. That would mean my grandfather (had he still been living) would have been close to 80 years old. That is four times twenty. Taking the average of my family tree database, one more generation could have fit between my grandfather and myself. My dad was old enough to be my grandfather (well, let’s not tell him that!). There is a full generation between my brother and myself. He was 21 years old when I was born. As with me, my father’s oldest niece was five years younger than him. My oldest nephew was born I was not quite four years old!

Lloyd William Amore, my paternal grandfather, was born on March 4, 1882 in Coshocton county, Ohio. He was the fourth child and third son to William Henry Amore (Henry) and Mary Angelina (Annie) Werts. Henry was almost 30 years old when my grandfather was born. By the time his last child was born in November 1893, he was close to 42 years old. Henry’s father, my great-great-grandfather (William Amore), born in February 1828 was just over 24 years old when his second wife gave birth to Henry. William was almost 49 years old when his last child was born (the child didn’t live). The span of years between William’s birth and my birth is almsot 134 years. That is a at least 6 generations on average. SIX! And in my case it was 1) William 2) William Henry 3) Lloyd William 4) my dad 5) me.

My dad’s oldest niece (my first cousin) who is five years younger than my dad, became a grandmother when I was three years old. My dad became a first time grandfather when my nephew was born. So he was a grandfather in his early 40s as well as a parent to a young child!

So in the immortal lyrics of a Frankie Valli song – my 2nd great-grandfather, William Amore, is “so close, so close and yet so far.”

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Recently, I received information from Johanne Gervais that said:

I was wondering if you would post something for all your followers of French Canadian descent. The Quebec Family History society presents Roots 2015 – An international conference on family history in Quebec from June 19-21, 2015 at McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. It is the largest English language genealogical conference held in Quebec. For further information you could go to http://www.qfhs.ca/cpage.php?pt=174

I went to the link provided and it appears that this is sponsored by the Quebec Family History Society that will presented on June 19, 20 and 21. Keynote speaker will be Rick Roberts, Founder of Global Genealogy. There will be information on the Canadian version of Ancestry.com; how to find land and probate records in Quebec; DNA testing; the War of 1812 in Quebec, and much more!

I do not have ancestors that have lived in Quebec or any part of Canada (at least, I haven’t come across them!) but if you are a reader of this blog and feel that this conference would be something for you, please go to the link provided above and check it out.

Disclaimer: I did not solicit this information and have no ties to the Quebec Family History Society or any of the companies involved in this conference.

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New Page

If you look above at the tabs, you’ll notice that I’ve added a new page. I will be updating it periodically but right now it has the beginnings of an Index of Posts pertaining to the Surnames that I am researching. Hopefully, this might make it easier (for me as well) to keep track of what I’ve written about which relative/ancestor!

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Hello 2013!

Hammer365_070_295_Pen_and_Print_(4425571355)

I hope everyone had an enjoyable and safe New Years Eve!  Today, as we begin a brand New Year filled with hopes, dreams, goals, resolutions, and opportunities, let us all remember to treat others with compassion and common courtesy. No one wears a sign that gives their life story so harboring judgmental attitudes isn’t fair to anyone. We are all human and therefore, have shortcomings, failings, and dreams.

I rarely ever set New Years resolutions but I do strive each day to be a better person than I was the day before. Last year I didn’t even set genealogy goals for the year. This year, I do have some goals that I would like to set – if for no reason than to make sure I have a checklist that I can go back to if I soon find myself wandering off in another direction.

  • Participate in the 6th Annual Ohio Genealogical Society Writing Competition
  • Index/Arbitrate at least 100 records per month on FamilySearch
  • Write at least one blog post a week
  • Comment on blog posts that I read – even if it is only to say “Thanks for posting this!” – I believe feedback is very important
  • Compile all the information I’ve been emailed by distant cousins concerning family history in one location
  • Save my family database to Dropbox and do a back up once a week
  • Ditto for pictures and other files on my computer
  • Scan the rest of the slides I have using my new slide/35mm scanner that my daughter and her fiance gave me for Christmas!

That doesn’t seem like too much for the year but I don’t want to set any goals that I don’t think I can meet.

What are your genealogy goals for 2013?

Photo courtesy of: David Reber from Kansas City, USA (Hammer365: 070/295 Pen and Print  Uploaded by Fæ) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

(No copyright infringement intended.)

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Goodbye 2012!

 

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Today, people everywhere will say goodbye to 2012. For some the year was very bad, for others 2012 was a very good year, and for most of us – the year held a mixture of both good and bad, happy and sad. News highlights of the year included terrorist bombings in several parts of the world, the deaths of celebrities, a very heated and politically charged U.S. Presidential election, the tragedy of the Connecticut school shooting, the continuing war in Afghanistan and the beginning of the U.S. pull-out of Iraq, and whether or not the Mayans had predicted the end of the world (as of today – they had not!).

The past year has also been one for the genealogical record books. Everyone was on the edge of their seats with anticipation over the release of the 1940 U.S. Census in April which brought forth indexers by the hundreds (thousands?) who made such huge in-roads indexing the census that finding family and those from the “Greatest Generation” became easier faster.  More genealogy blogs were published, Ancestry’s commercials were everywhere, family historians were up in arms when it was announced that “Who Do You Think You Are” was not going to be given a 4th season, more and more attended RootsTech 2012 and other conventions/classes/society meetings.  Yet the year also ended on a bittersweet note for some as they realized years and years of their hard work had just been “lifted” without regard to copyright not to mention common courtesy and ethics.

The year 2012 for me had its ups and downs with regard to genealogy. I signed up to be a volunteer indexer for the 1940 U.S. Census, among other databases, and mid-way into that, I was also approved as an arbitrator. I found almost all of my dad’s family members and my mom’s family. I was able to spend a little more time writing articles for this blog, and consequently read several blogs quite frequently. Unfortunately the beginning of November (election day to be specific), my hard drive decided to quit. Even though I had backed everything up, I hadn’t done it as recently as I should – so I lost several things. I can recreate what I have lost – it’s just a matter of spending the time to do it.  Moral of the story: back up once a month, once a week, or even once a day. Better yet – keep current files and photos in the cloud so they can be accessed at any time from any computer.

Happy New Year and Happy Hunting in 2013!

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As Thansgiving 2012 ends and the Advent season is a week away, I thought I’d reflect on what transpires in between. First up is Black Friday. While many get excited when this arrives – even plan routes, stores, and means of “attack” – I have only braved the early (early!) crowds once. Yes, that means one, uno, singular.
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Yesterday, I shopped but not at some inhumane time! I did some online shopping very late on Thanksgiving and went to three “bargain” stores mid-afternoon Friday.
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Second, the annual Christmas movie watching. Our family began by watching “Miracle on 34th Street” and “White Christmas” on Thanksgiving. Friday we watched “Polar Express.” There will be more viewing opportunities to come as we settle in to watch “Prancer,” the Santa Clause movies with Tim Allen & especially “It’s a Wonderful Life!” Is the original “Die Hard” considered a Christmas movie!?
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My birthday always falls after Thanksgiving – so that means a pizza dinner.
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This year the annual Ohio State vs. Michigan football game falls after Thanksgiving. My family has a long history with the Buckeyes and being from Ohio, I will be cheering for the boys in red.

Next Sunday – December 2 – will be the first Sunday of Advent. Our church Christmas Tree will be decorated and traditional Advent hymns will be sung. Sometime in the next couple of weeks, our home Christmas tree will be set up. When my children were little, they all decorated it while we took pictures. As they’ve grown up, the decorating has fallen to grandkids and which ever kids are here. It always is magical to watch the ornaments being selected and locating just the right spot for it amongst the branches of our artificial tree. Then it’s my job to pick out the garland. We’ve had tinsel, strand garland of gold or silver, pearl strands wound around the tree, and ribbon. Normally, an angel rests on top of the tree or a star. The year I used a giant red velvet bow was not looked upon fondly so I won’t do that again! By Christmas Eve the tree is ready for Santa’s visit.
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As I reflect upon our family’s activities and traditions, I wonder what my grandparents and great-grandparents experiences were. I’m pretty sure at the heart of the holidays was family – just as it is for mine.

Happy Thanksgiving and Merry Christmas!

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Taken in 1958 at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, Ohio) when my grandfather, Col. Glen R. Johnson, retired from the Air Force. Those in the picture include: my Uncle Glen (Jr.), my Aunt Mary, my Uncle Johnny, my grandmother – Vesta, my brother Jim, and my grandfather – Glen.  I’m not sure why they were all looking in different directions and no one is left to ask. (On a side note – I also am in possession of the painting above my grandfather!)

(Photograph taken by Air Force Official photographer, in possession of Wendy Littrell, Address FOR PRIVATE USE)

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