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Posts Tagged ‘SNGF’

Each Saturday evening, Randy Seaver at Genea-Musings challeges other geneabloggers to participate in Saturday Night Genealogy Fun. Tonight, the theme is Ancestor Fun. The mission (should we choose to accept it!) is to pick a great-grandfather, divide his birth year by 100 and round up to the next number. Then, go to the ancestor on the ahnentafel list and find the ancestor with that number and give three facts about that person.

I chose my maternal great-grandfather, Joseph Napolean Wilt (father of my maternal grandmother), who was born in 1869. After dividing his birth year by 100 and getting 18.69, I rounded up to 19.  I use Family Tree 2011 as my genealogy program. I am the home person so I clicked on Publish at the top, then under “Charts and Reports” I clicked on Genealogy Reports. I chose the Ahnentafel Report. After the report came up, I scrolled to number 19 to see which ancestor I would write about. It was my 2nd great-grandmother, Louisa Bookless.

The line from me to her is as follows: my dad, his dad (Lloyd William Amore), Lloyd’s mother (Mary Angelina Werts Amore), “Annie’s” mother was Lousia Bookless. She was born to David Bookless and Mary Cartmell on April 13, 1834 in Muskingum county, Ohio. She married William Washington Werts (my 2nd great-grandfather) on August 24, 1852 in Coshocton county, Ohio.  I found the marriage entry on FamilySearch.org in the database – “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994″ and downloaded the digital image. Louisa married a second time after William died to John Simon on April 28, 1861 in Coshocton county, Ohio. Louisa died of “apoplexy” on July 26, 1912 in Coshocton, Ohio and was buried in St. Paul’s Cemetery in Coshocton.

Three facts about Louisa Bookless:

  1. Most of the documents I have found concerning Louisa, has her maiden name spelled “Buckless” – especially census records.
  2. Louisa’s parents died when she was young, so she is found living with relatives in the 1850 and 1860 censuses. In 1850, Louisa and her older brother, William, are living in the James Rice household in Franklin Twp, Coshocton county, Ohio. I have not discovered if he was related to Louisa. In the 1860 census, Louisa is living with her late husband’s sister, Susannah (Werts) Shirer and her husband, Quincy.  The two children she had borne while married to William Werts were living in other households which seems to indicate that Louisa did not have any means of supporting her children and needed to rely on family for support.
  3. Louisa’s first husband – my 2nd great-grandfather, passed away five years after they were married. Their oldest child, George Wesley Werts, was born five months after their wedding and my great-grandmother came along two years later. Four years after William’s death, Louisa and John Simon married.  They became parents of a daughter (Sarah Ellen Simon) three years after they married.  I did not realize my great-grandmother had a half-sister until I kept coming back to the census listing her in the same household as Louisa and John as their daughter. When I checked the newspaper account for a reunion held at my great-grandparents, I discovered that Ellen’s family came to that reunion.

louisa_b

Louisa’s Death Certificate

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I’m a couple days late on responding to Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post at Genea-Musings. The questions posed were how the family reacts to genealogy interests; do they listen to stories; and funny stories to share about another family member’s interest in genealogy.

Amore: On the paternal side of my family, there have been several that have delved into genealogy including: my grandfather’s brother, Zade (Isaiah), and my great-uncle Rollo’s great-grandson, Rick. Two people who helped me quite a bit when I was starting out in 1999-2000 were my cousin, Bill Jr., and my cousin, Sharon Brittigan.

House: Along the maternal line of my dad’s family, besides my cousin, Bill Amore, Jr., (see above), a few of the House cousins were also compiling information and sharing it with me. My dad’s uncle, Alva Lester House, helped by sending a letter to my dad’s oldest sister with some family information.

Johnson: On the maternal side of my family, there have been a whole host of relatives and cousins who did quite a bit of research.  The closest to me was my grandfather, Glen R. Johnson, Sr. He sent letters and information to others in the family – who have in turn (many, many years later) shared it with me!  My distant Johnson cousins, Virginia, Ruth and Alice, and myself have formed a 4-person research “team” when it comes to the Johnson family.  Virginia has been the biggest researcher though!  I wouldn’t be very far with out her help!

Wilt: This is my maternal grandmother’s family line.  Several of her cousins had trod the genealogy path so as the information trickled down to their descendants, it was shared with me (and my research shared with them).

Goul/Blazer: My grandfather’s maternal lines – again my grandfather had some of the information written down in notes and letters.

Stern: Before I was very old, at least one Stern relative was already deep into research – Virginia (Stern) Ruark. Now, her daughter, Marvel, has taken up the mantle, and between she and several others, we do quite a bit of information sharing and assisting.

My husband’s side has been researched by his sister – with help from other cousins and relatives – long before Census records were digitized and put online!

Of my four children, only my son has taken on a position as a family history researcher. He has spent several years researching the paternal side of his family and connecting with family and other distant relatives.  When I need to share stories, I usually tell him because he seems to appreciate it more than the others (the rest just roll their eyes at me!).  However, if I want to share a scandal, everyone is all ears!

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Randy Seaver, of Genea-Musings, posted his SNGF via Michael John Neill’s RootDig post, 10 Signs You Have Genealogy OCD, and asked fellow geneabloggers to post their own 10 Signs of Genealogy OCD.  So here are mine:

  1. You overhear people at church, the supermarket, or standing in any line, mention they are headed to Connecticut, Michigan, Ohio, or Indiana for vacation and tell them that you have ancestors buried there.
  2. You see an ancestral name on one of your fellow geneablogger’s websites or blog and ask them for a gedcom in order to determine if you are distantly related.
  3. Your spouse asks you if you know anyone buried there each time you pass a cemetery.
  4. You check for library books that mention your ancestor’s regiment in the Civil War in hopes of finding a picture that he might be in.
  5. You read everything you can about Abraham Lincoln because the story passed down mentions that your great-grandfather shook hands with him in hopes of figuring out where, when and how that might have occured.
  6. You check familysearch.org several times a day hoping that there are new or updated databases for Ohio and Indiana.
  7. You pester your local library about getting Ancestry Library edition because your 6 month free trial from your FTM 2011 software ran out and you really only got to use it for about 30 days.
  8. You schedule your Friday nights around “Who Do You Think You Are?” when they have new shows.
  9. Your family knows your genealogy “happy dance” all too well and scatter before you can tell them why you are excited and what new information you’ve found.
  10. The only genealogy information your family wants to hear about is when there are scandals involved – and the closer the ancestor – the better!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this – have you seen yourself in any of mine?

 

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Our Saturday Night Genealogy Fun assignment from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings, and based on Katie O’s post You Might Be a Genealogist If . . .”>You Might Be a Genealogist If . . . on Where You Came Fromblog, for this Saturday is Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – You Might Be a Genealogist if . . .. We were to make up our own sayings. Immediately several came to mind.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you are driving on vacation and see a billboard touting a county of that state and you say “I know people buried there!” (to which your spouse would reply – “And do you speak to them often?” – yes, this has happened to me!)

You might be a genealogist if . . . you get excited when people show up at your workplace (a church) and inquire about what information there might be about their ancestors who founded the congregation and you start pulling out all the history information, rolls, and other stuff (work? what work?)

You might be a genealogist if . . . you don’t realize how glazed over your siblings or children’s eyes get when you start telling them about the latest connection you’ve documented.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you see a familiar surname on another blog and contact the author to see if they share a common ancestor with you.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you always steer the conversation at family events to dates, times, names, and who has the family bible, marriage certificate from the gr-grandparents, or addresses of distant cousins who might have what you are looking for.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you choose to write the obituary for a close family member in order to list all the first and middle names and relatonships of the survivors and deceased parents, siblings, as well as all of their jobs, education, and hobbies so future generations won’t have to guess at any of that.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you know which libraries in a twenty mile radius have Ancestry Library edition in case you need to go use it.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you get excited and offer all sorts of help when a friend or acquaintence happens to mention in passing that someday they’d like to start doing genealogy research.

That’s mine – and yes, all of the above are true!

Thanks Katie and Randy – that was fun!

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I’m a day late on a Saturday Night Genealogy Fun post (thanks for the topic, Randy Seaver, of Genea-Musings!).

Several of my Best of 2009 moments came from items that fell into my lap so to speak.  After my mother passed away, I found many documents and photos that I hadn’t been looking for, but was very excited to find. 

  1. My maternal grandparents’ framed Marriage Certificate, my maternal grandmother’s parents’ marriage certificate and their parents’ marriage certificates!
  2. Birth Certificates for my mother and her siblings and my maternal grandparents.
  3. My maternal grandparents’ wills (I’d seen these when they had passed away but now have the actual documents and all the letters and court papers through probate.)
  4. Very Large Portraits of Ancestors.
  5. Address books that gave me some clues about family residences and my grandparents’ friends.

Looking back on my posts in 2009, I’ve picked a few that I consider my “best”:

  1. January 24 – Meeting Julia. I was able to learn a little more about my paternal grandmother’s sister via this biography.
  2. February 18 – Additional Research Techniques. I highlighted how researching a book on Coshocton marriages enabled me to put some pieces to a family puzzle together.
  3. March 2 – Childhood Enemies – Adult BFFs written for the 11th Edition of Smile for the Camera.
  4. September 30 – The Box, part one of a 2 part post that concluded with the October 1st post –  The Calendar. This was one of the items I found at the bottom of a trunk at my mom’s house and told the intimate story of my “baby” aunt’s brief life from my grandmother’s perspective.
  5. October 17 – Mingling of Families and Murder. This post was very challenging as I tired to untangle how two sides of my family were forever entwined.

I also realized just how helpful others can be.  Not only did a lady take pictures of headstones for me via Find A Grave, but she did some research at her local library and sent me some news clippings.  I also connected with a distant Goul cousin who mailed some very valuable family history information.

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I’m a day late with Saturday Night Genealogy Fun that Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings posted last night.  The challenge was to list the number of descendents of one of the four sets of great-grandparents, how many are living or deceased, and how many we’ve met.

Reunion of the Amore – Werts Family 1924

My paternal great-grandparents, William Henry Amore (“Henry”) and Mary Angelina Werts (Annie) have over 457 descendents!  They had:

  • Children: 7 (Clemmie, Zade, Rollo, Clarence, Lloyd – my grandfather, Bert, and Roy) – all deceased

Wmamore

Back: Bert, Rollo, Zade, Clarence, Lloyd
Front: Roy, Henry, Annie, Clemmie

  • Grandchildren: 36 (Clemmie – 4, Zade – 1, Rollo – 3, Clarence – 2, Lloyd – 8, Bert – 5, Roy -13); Deceased: 30

amorefamily1

Gene (my dad), Paul, Bervil, Ella (my grandmother), Gail, Norman, Lloyd (my grandfather), Gertrude, Marie

  • Great-grandchildren: 122 (26 Known – Deceased
  • 2nd great-grandchildren: 166 (10 Known – Deceased)
  • 3rd great-grandchildren: 113
  • 4th great-grandchildren: 13

I’ve met: 

  • Five of the children (my grandfather’s four brothers) – Clarence, Roy, Zade, Rollo, & Bert.  My grandfather and his sister were both deceased by the time I was born.
  • Some of the children of my grandfather’s siblings and their grandchildren – but I was young so I don’t remember names.
  • Almost all of my grandfather’s descendents – my dad’s siblings and their children (my first cousins) – who due to the wide age range – are much older than me.  Some of my first cousins’ grandchildren I’ve never met.

 I’ve had the good fortune to meet one 1st cousin I didn’t know I had a couple of years ago and continue to correspond with her via Facebook and email.  Some of the distant Amore relatives have also contacted me via email or by phone after receiving a query letter from me several years ago.  I feel very blessed that we continue our familial relationship even if it is through email or Facebook.

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Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings, who took an idea from Leland Metzler of Genealogy Blog, posted his Saturday Night Fun yesterday and it is about Satisfying Genealogy Moments.

The most thrilling parts of researching my ancestry are hearing and/or finding distant cousins – especially those whom I didn’t even know existed.  Case in point – a child put up for adoption by a great-aunt, an uncle’s child that no one ever knew about, children of a woman I thought had lived as a nun her entire life (but didn’t!), and descendents of my maternal great-grandmother’s sister!  Not only have I connected with these people, but we shared information and still email each other.

Another exciting aspect of digging into my roots is when I find documentation and proof of a relationship.  Family lore and stories are one thing but to see an actual document that proves those stories is a “stand up and cheer” moment!  I’ve had many of those over the course of the last 10 years.

Hopefully I will make contact with more distant relatives and uncover much more documentation as I continue my quest!

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Randy Seaver (who is lacking a good internet connection now – he’s having to pay a horrible price for just a little bit of connection time) has still posted the Saturday Night Genealogy Fun: Ahnentafel Roulette on his blog, Genea-Musings.

1. How old is my father: 88

2. Divide that number by 4: 22

3. The person on my Ahnentafel chart that is #22 is: Evan Ogan (my note: Oh, of all the people!!!)

4. Three facts about that person:

  1. Evan, born 1785 in Culpepper County, Virginia, is the foster father of my paternal g-grandmother, Frances V. (Ogan) House. 
  2. He married Susannah Fritter in 1807.
  3. He is found living in Rich Hill, Muskingum County, Ohio in the 1850 Census; in Spencer, Guernsey County, Ohio in the 1860 Census; living with his son, Lot, in Meigs Twp, Muskingum County, Ohio in the 1870 Census.
  4. Evan died when he was 88 (abt. 1879) at the home of his youngest son in Meigs Twp, Muskingum County, Ohio (presumably that son was Lot) – cause of death was paralysis (according to his obituary).

So I listed 4 facts.  My great-grandmother, Frances Ogan, lived with Evan and Susannah since the 1850 Census – she was listed as Frances Foster.  I may never know whether or not Frances was related to them, if they knew her parents, or if the family lore is accurate: that she was left on a doorstep.

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I think Sheri started this with Simply Brilliant Idea on her blog, The Educated Genealogist and then Randy is listing the idea as this week’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun at Genea-Musings. Sheri had mentioned a few days ago on Facebook that only a couple other people had made their Trading Cards. I commented that I would soon. Well – here it is! I use this picture for my Google identity.

deck4a442a023e7c6c1505b4e409774a369cd9e3ac83

Thanks, Sheri and Randy!  Hope this is okay!

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I’m a day late, but thought I’d participate in Randy Seaver’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun over at Genea-Musings.  This topic was to post informaton about our 16 great-great-grandparents.

 pedigree

1. William Amore b. February 6, 1828 in Albany, N.Y.  d. February 9, 1896 in Coshocton County, Ohio.  On the 1880 Census, he listed that his father was born in England and his mother was born in New York.  Nationality - probably English.

2. Charlotte Reed Imons b. August 4, 1828 in Ohio d. October 9, 1862 in Coshocton County, Ohio.  Nationality – unknown

3. William Washington Werts b. December 25, 1829 in Muskingum County, Ohio d. April 7, 1857 in Ohio.  William’s 2nd g-grandfather was born in Baden and the history documented about the Werts family suggests most of them originated in the German area.  Nationality – German

4. Louisa Bookless b. April 13, 1834 in Muskingum County, Ohio d. July 26, 1912 in Coshocton County, Ohio.  Nationality – probably English

5. Florus Allen House b. January 5, 1813 in New York d. June 25, 1891 in Coshocton County, Ohio.  Nationality – English

6. Julia Ann Lewis b. December 24, 1815 in Ohio d. October 6, 1899 in Coshocton County, Ohio.  Nationality – Unknown

7. Evan Ogan - He was the Foster father of my g-grandmother, Frances Virginia Ogan.  It is unknown if he was directly related to her.

8. Susannah Fritter – She was the Foster mother of my g-grandmother, Frances Virginia Ogan.  It is unknown if Susannah was directly related to her.

James Wilson Johnson, I think9. James Wilson Johnson b. August 16, 1829 in Byrd Township, Brown County, Ohio d. October 17, 1917 in Anderson, Madison County, Indiana. Based on family lore – nationality is English.

10. Amanda Evaline Mullis b. 1833 in North Carolina d. March 21, 1868 in Rush County, Indiana.  Nationality – Scottish

11. Franklin Blazer b. June 2, 1836 probably in Indiana d. August 25, 1869 in Madison County, Indiana. Nationality – English & German

malissa_blazer12. Malissa Goul b. Oct. 1832 in Champaign County, Ohio d. March 7, 1907 in Anderson, Madison County, Indiana. Nationality – German
isrealstern13. Israel Isaac Wilt b. September 9, 1827 in Rockingham County, Virginia d. September 11, 1919 in Henry County, Indiana. Nationality – German

14. Christena Nash b. abt. 1837 in Pennsylvania d. August 18, 1876 in Henry County, Indiana. Nationality – Unknown

emanuelstern_nancy15. Emanual Bushong Stern b. October 7, 1834 in Montgomery County, Ohio d. September 10, 1911 in Nebraska. Nationality – German

16. Nancy Caylor b. May 10, 1840 in Wayne County, Indiana d. December 21, 1900 in Noblesville, Hamilton County, Indiana. Nationality – German

Out of my 16 great-great-grandparents, 2 of them are Unknown – the biological parents of Frances Virginia Ogan.  It is highly doubtful that I will ever find out who they are since she was either farmed out or dropped on a doorstep as a small child.  Four of them are of English descent.  One is of English and German descent.  Three are of Unknown descent.  One is of Scottish descent and the remaining 5 are of German descent.

I am:  31.75% German
            25.5% English
             6.25% Scottish
           36.5% Unknown (although I believe it to be a combination of English, German, Scottish and French)

Interesting facts: William Amore was the only one of my 2nd great-grandparents who was the 1st generation American.

Most of my 2nd great-grandparents were born and/or died in Indiana or Ohio.

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