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Posts Tagged ‘Google Books’

franklin blazer grave

(Photo of gravestone by Gaye Dillon taken on 23 July 2009)

A year ago I wrote about my great-great-grandfather Franklin Blazer in Week 1 of the 2014 Edition of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. Up until today, the cause of his death was a mystery. He died on August 25, 1869 so I thought he may have died due to injuries sustained in the Civil War or perhaps he was killed in a farming accident or died of some disease. I was so very wrong.

What could only be termed a tragedy is what befell poor Franklin. He and Malissa Goul had been married at least ten years and possibly upward to 14 years. Their children, two boys and three girls, ranged in age from 2 years to 9 years old. In fact the oldest son, John F., was a month from turning ten – not yet a teenager and definitely not ready to be the “man of the house” at such a young age. Malissa’s son from a previous relationship, James Oakland Goul, was about fourteen.

Thanks to a post on Genea-Musings by fellow geneablogger Randy Seaver, I learned about a new free search tool call Genealogy Gophers. It searches for names in texts of Google books. I plugged in the name of Franklin Blazer and the first result that popped up listed not only Franklin Blazer but Malissa Goul. I knew I had found the correct person. I clicked on the snippet and lo and behold it was an entire book that included tons of information on those with the surname of Blazer and everything within the soundex of B-426 written by John Allison Blazer from Hendersonville, Tennessee. There isn’t a date on it except for the filmed date of 2000.

The information concerning Franklin reports that he was married to Malissa Goul and listed her birth and death dates and they lived in Pendleton, Indiana. It listed their children – four correctly: John, Philip Wesley, Kate and Rachel but listed Martha Ann erroneously as Matthew. Of course when I saw that, I thought perhaps there was another son that I hadn’t heard of but then realized that Martha had been left out. (She is also listed further in the book – still as Matthew – with a child named Chase – so I knew that the name had been mangled). But then I saw something I didn’t know: Franklin died “when struck by lightning in his home.”

I can’t even imagine what the rest of the family went through after that. Did Malissa and any of the children witness this? Did they try to revive their husband and father after he had fallen dead? Was a physician summoned quickly? The weather must have been pretty fierce. It was still tornado season so I wondered if they were also terrified of what else Mother Nature had in store for them.

Franklin had just turned 33 years old. He would never be able to enjoy a life of watching his children grow up and get married. His wife, my second great-grandmother – would never celebrate another wedding anniversary. She remained a widow the rest of her life. Martha, Katie and Rachel all married without their father giving them away. John and Wesley grew into men quickly in order to take on what their father had once done. Twenty-six years after his father’s tragic death, John died of self-inflicted gunshot wound.

As I think about my great-grandmother, Katie, who lost her father when she was almost five years old, I wonder if she had been a “daddy’s girl” and missed him terribly the rest of her life. Or was she so young that she barely remembered him? Did losing Franklin at such a young age change Malissa – her outlook on life, personality, or how she handled sorrow from then on?

His tombstone stands in Grovelawn Cemetery in Pendleton, Indiana. It reads:

FRANKLIN
son of
J & M BLAZER
DIED
AUG 25 1869
AGED
33 Y. 2 M & 23 D.

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bookshelf-vector-illustration_18-12587

I am so thankful there is such an animal as Google Books! I’ve been able to find tons of information, published genealogies, and even see drawings or photos of ancestral locations and homes. These are books that have been digitized – books that I would have a difficult time finding unless I spent a lot of time and money.

Titles that I have in my “collection” include:

  • Savery and Severy Genealogy (Savory and Savary) by Alfred William Savary published by the Fort Hill Press (Boston), 1905, located at the Wisconsin Historical Society.
  • A Genealogy of the Savery Families (Savory and Savary) by A.W. Savary, assisted by Miss Linda A. Savary published by the Collins Press (Boston), 1893; located at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
  • Genealogy of the Lyman Family in Britain and America by Lyman Coleman published in Albany, New York, 1872, located at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
  • Genealogical Records of Thomas Burnham, the Emigrant by Roderick H. Burnham published The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co. Print, 1884, located at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
  • The New England Historical and Genealogical Register Volume LXVII published by the N.E. Historic Genealogical Society (Boston), 1913, located at the Stanford Library.
  • Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of the State of Massachusetts by William Richard Cutter (Ed.), assisted by William Frederick Adams published by Lewis Historical Publishing Company (New York), 1910, located at Harvard College Library.
  • The Genealogy of the Bigelow Family of America by Gilman Bigelow Howe printed by Charles Hamilton (Massachusetts), 1890, located at Harvard College Library.
  • Genealogy of the Loveland Family in the United States of America by J.B. Loveland and George Loveland published by I.M. Keeler & Sons, Printer (Ohio), 1895, located at the Wisconsin Historical Society.
  • Genealogy of the First Seven Generations of the Bidwell Family in America by Edwin M. Bidwell published by Joel Munson’s Sons (New York), 1884, located at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
  • Glastenbury for Two Hundred Years: A Centennial Discourse by Rev. Alonzo B. Chapin published by Case, Tiffany and Company (Hartford), 1853, located at the Harvard College Library.
  • Historical Sketches and Reminisces of Madison County, Indiana by John L. Forkner and Byron H. Dyson published in Anderson, Ind., 1897, located at the Harvard College Library. (I also own this book.)
  • History of Idaho Vol. III published by the S. J. Clarke Publishing Company (Chicago), 1920, located at the Harvard College Library.
  • A Genealogy of the Appleton Family by W. S. Appleton published by T. R. Marvin & Son (Boston), 1874, located at the Boston Public Library.
  • New England Families Genealogical and Memorial by William Richard Cutter published by Lewis Historical Publishing Company (New York), 1914, located at the Harvard College Library.
  • The Goodrich Family in America by Lafayette Wallace Case published by Fergus Printing Company (Chicago), 1889, located at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
  • The Hollister Family of America; Lieut. John Hollister and His Descendants compiled by Lafayette Wallace Case published by Fergus Printing Company (Chicago), 1886, located at the Harvard College Library.
  • The Risley Family History by Edwin H. Risley published by the Grafton Press (New York), 1909, located at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
  • A Genealogical Record of the Descendants of Martin Oberholtzer by Rev. A. J. Fretz published by The Evergreen News (New Jersey), 1903, located at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.

If you haven’t searched Google Books yet for your ancestors or a history of the area where they lived, I urge you to do so. You’ll never know what you can uncover!

 

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Earlier this week, Dick Eastman announced on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter that the Washington State Digital Archives contain 74 million records that can be accessed online. You can read about the announcement here.

On Thursday, I received an email from a gal that I’ve corresponded with (as we both share ancestors in our Maple/Fuller line) from Coshocton, Ohio. She forwarded information from the Ohio Civil War list on Rootsweb that Evendon.com now has several records and books that can be searched.

Yesterday, Terry Thornton of Hill Country of Monroe County reminded me that Google Books is a very valuable resource. I’ve used it for awhile now and concur with Terry! If you haven’t searched this site for any resources related to your ancestry, I urge you to give it a try! Thanks, Terry, for the reminder about this site!

And if you who use Family Search Labs, you’ll notice that many more records have been added. Earlier this week, the site was updated and two databases – Ohio Death Records and Freedman’s Bank Records – weren’t there! They were back online Friday. Apparently, according to a response I received from my feedback email, there had been some problems with the records that needed to be fixed.

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