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Tomorrow is Blog Action Day with the theme of “Poverty”. Please click the link in order to go to the web site. There will be links to many blogs – not just genealogy. I urge you to go read the posts to see what everyone’s saying!

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Location: a cemetery in Coshocton County

Time of Day: Broad daylight – middle of the day

Weather: Warm

Event:  While looking for an ancestor’s grave, the day suddenly turned cool and shadows were splayed over the headstones.  The feeling was that the area was “haunted.”

True or False?

UPDATE: This post is TRUE – although I reported it second-hand!   When my cousin, Billy, went to Orange Grove Cemetery (also known as Richmond Cemetery) in Coshocton County to take pictures of Frances (Price) Amore’s gravestone (she was the first wife of my 2nd gr-grandfather, William Amore), he said the cemetery was very spooky.  The town close to the cemetery hasn’t seen much activity for almost 100 years.  He said it became quite eery and chilly on a warm day and didn’t spend too long lingering.

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Due to a very busy schedule, my Freaky Friday articles will be suspended for the time being.  I haven’t had much time to come up with creative posts.  I will possibly be submitting something for Halloween along the “Freaky” aspect of the posts.  Apologies for those who tune in to read these.  Regular posting will continue.

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The theme for the 6th edition of Smile for the Camera is “Funny Bone”.  Show us that picture that never fails to bring a smile to your face! An amusing incident, a funny face, an unusual situation. Share!  Choose a photograph of an ancestor, relative, yourself, or an orphan photograph that tickles your Funny Bone and bring it to the carnival. Admission is free with every photograph!  Your submission may include as many or as few words as you feel are necessary to describe your treasured photograph. Those words may be in the form of an expressive comment, a quote, a journal entry, a poem (your own or a favorite), a scrapbook page, or a heartfelt article. The choice is yours!

So the following picture is my submission – and it is timely as this photo was taken at Halloween almost 10 years ago.

Explaining why this picture tickles my “funny bone” also shows what a sick family we are!  The little fella next to the “Scream” monster was made by my kids.  They took a pilllow case and made a face on it, then took my son’s clothes and stuffed them with rags and newspapers to “fill it out”.  Then they placed it in a lawn chair in our front yard the evening of Halloween.  The “Scream” monster sits next to the little fella.

So as kids are trick or treating that night, they have to walk by these two things sitting in lawn chairs.  Most of them give the characters a sideways glance and keep going.  A few kids had to be cajoled to pass by.  One mom was bound and determined to prove to her daughter that the “Scream” monster was not real.  She came closer and studied it.  She waited too long – my son jumped at her.  Yes, he was the “Scream” monster.  The lady screamed & they raced down the sidewalk.  Needless to say our family had a good belly laugh.

I know that we shouldn’t laugh at other’s expense – but it was Halloween & our family does that holiday in a big way!  So the moral of the story is – if you think something isn’t real – you might be wrong and if you can’t take the scare – don’t get too close!

(On a sidenote: My son wouldn’t have done that to a small child!)

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This little fella came to visit recently!  He’s the Genea-Blogger Gnome!  You’ll probably see lots of his clones on other genea-blogs!  We are celebrating our “Getting to Know You”  Round-up that will be posted VERY soon!  If you would like to see who participated in this challenge, please visit Hill Country of Monroe County and give a round of applause to Terry Thornton who organized this wonderful opportunity for all of YOU to get to know all of US and for all of US to get to know one another! Perhaps we’ll be seeing you and your blog in a round-up, challenge, meme, or Carnival real soon!

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In Searching for Buried Treasure I listed my course of action to find some “buried treasure” in my genealogy files/ephemera.

My search took me a little off course – which is nothing unusual for me.  Before I actually pulled out the box of letters that I was going to look through, I noticed a box on my vanity that I’d only looked inside of one time.  That was a few years ago when my dad first gave it to me.  So I decided to open it back up to see exactly what was inside of it.

Upon opening the clasp and lifting a lid, there was an envelope on the top of the stack.  It was addressed to my grandmother, Ella Amore, and was from the US Army Recruiting Office at Fort Hayes, Columbus, Ohio.  Apparently it was sent upon my dad’s enlistment in the Army Air Corps and wanted to make sure that all of his statements were true.

  

Behind that were other envelopes containing pictures I had actually sent to my dad many years ago as the kids were growing up.  He returned the pictures to me.

Next were two handkerchiefs.  One was sent from my dad to his mother when he was stationed in Iceland and the other was one that he had given to her when he was a young boy.

Underneath the hankies was a Webster notebook.  My dad had used it in 6th grade.  Apparently it was for History as he had pasted a photo from a magazine, book or newspaper on one page and opposite that wrote a brief explanation that related to history.

On the right hand side next to the books and documents were a horseshoe, a film canister filled with sand that was labeled White Sands, New Mexico 1933, a tiny lapel or tie pin that was labeled with my Uncle Paul’s name, a small lock, a watch without the wristband, a mother of pearl handled pocket-knife, a ceramic ashtray and a football with something inside.  My dad told me that he hasn’t opened that football in over 50 years.  He thinks there is a pecan or a nut inside the football. 

 

Underneath the notebook was a book on Agriculture.  I think my father either had an Ag course in high school or he bought it to read.

This gave me just a small glimpse into my dad’s younger life.  Items that he thought were important – or at least important to him.  And if they were important enough for him to keep in a trinket box, then they are important enough for me to hang on to in order to always have a part of my dad with me in the years to come.

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After reading Leslie Albrecht Huber’s article in the October 2008 edition of Family Chronicle, I began to wonder how many of us have a favorite ancestor (or two)! As Leslie writes, “There can be no favorite children or even grandchildren. But, the rule doesn’t apply to our ancestors.”

As I ponder this question, I’ll give you a chance to think of who your favorite ancestor might be.  Is it an ancestor who you know quite a bit about?  Or someone who is a complete mystery?  How did you learn of this person?  Post to your site and send me an email at wendy.littrell@juno.com or a message on Facebook with a link to your post.  Deadline will be October 12th and I’ll post a round-up on October 15th.

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