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Posts Tagged ‘challenge’

Some of the genea-bloggers are listing a “Year in Review” of their blogs for 2008. Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings discovered this meme at John Newmark’s Transylvanian Dutch blog. The idea is to take the first sentence from the first blog of each month. There will end up being 12 sentences. (Since I didn’t start my blog until April, I’ll only have 8 sentences!) So here we go . . .

  1. April: Welcome to “All My Branches” – my blog on genealogy.
  2. May: If I haven’t mentioned it here before, then I will now.
  3. June: Back in the mid 1960’s during a reunion trip to Coshocton, my parents had discussed finding a house that my dad’s mother had grown up in (or was born in). 
  4. July: Please go to Destination: Austin Family to read the 51st Carnival of Genealogy post.
  5. August: To my faithful readers – just a note that I will be posting new stuff soon!
  6. September: Yes, I’ve felt like I’ve taken a long commercial break!
  7. October: The theme for the 6th edition of Smile for the Camera is “Funny Bone”. 
  8. November: Glen Roy Johnson, Jr. being held by his mom (my grandmother), Vesta Wilt Johnson
  9. December: Miriam Robbins Midkiff, of Ancestories2 and Ancestories issued a new word prompt on her Ancestories2 blog.

So there you have it!

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8 Things About Me

Jessica at Jessica’s Genejournal tagged me for the Eight Things About Me meme. I’m a day late so I will post this today. Jessica’s challenge is:

  1. Each player starts with eight random fact/habits about themselves.
  2. People who are tagged need to write their own blog about their eight things and post these rules.
  3. A the end of your blog post, you need to choose eight people to get tagged and list their name.
  4. Don’t forget to leave them a comment telling them they’re tagged and to read your blog.

Here’s mine!

  1. I went through only one school district from K through 12th grade.
  2. I lived in the same house from the time I was born until I was 15.
  3. My brother was already married when I was born and my sister was a sophomore in High School.
  4. I have never been to New England but would love to see Boston and Connecticut.
  5. I’ve been writing poetry, songs, and fiction since I was 10.
  6. I became a graphic artist by chance – without any formal education.
  7. All four of my children grew up in the same house and graduated from the same high school.
  8. My grandson had the same Kindergarten teacher as his aunt and uncle and has the same 2nd grade teacher as his uncle (many, many years apart!).

I’m supposed to tag eight people but since I came into this a little late, I am going to say – if you haven’t been tagged – consider yourself so!

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Thanksgiving Meme

thanksgiving

My newfound cousin, Julie Cahill Tarr, at GenBlog, began a Thanksgiving meme and tagged me. The challenge is to write a blog post listing 2 things I’m thankful for and tag a person to spread the love.

I am thankful for having the best husband in the world who has been my rock for over 20 years; my parents, my four beautiful kids and three grandkids, my sister, niece, nephews, and extended family who I remain close to in spirit even if miles separate us.

I am thankful for being able to visit my mom for a second time this year.  Since my visits are usually a year apart, being able to see her four months after my last visit – especially at this time of year – was a wonderful blessing.

I am going to tag A. Spence of Spence-Lowry Family History.  Julie’s instructions for this meme are:

  1. Write a blog post telling us about 2 things you are thankful for.
  2. You can post the Thanksgiving Day banner above in your post if you like.
  3. Tag one person to spread the love.  Post a comment on their blog so they know they’ve been tagged.
  4. Send a link to your blog post by 11/25 to Julie at:  genblogjulie@gmail.com.

 Julie will post all submissions on 11/26!  Happy Thanksgiving!

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The topic for the 59th Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is: “Politics and Our Ancestors” in honor of Voting Day.  As I thought about this, I knew that I had several ancestors and collateral family members who had served in politics as well as members who were quite vocal in their political affiliations.

My paternal great-grandfather’s brother, George Washington Amore, was a Democrat and served as an Assessor for Linton Township in Coshocton County for three terms in the 1890′s.  In 1909 he ran for Mayor of Plainfield, Ohio.  George’s son-in-law, John D. Woodward, a respected man of Coshocton County, pledged his allegiance to the Democratic party, but held no public office. (Source information from “History of Coshocton County, Ohio: Its Past and Present, 1740-1881″.  Compiled by N.N. Hill, Jr.; Newark, Ohio; A.A. Graham & Co., Publishers; 1881; Carlon & Hollenbeck, Printers & Binders, Indianapolis, Ind.)

My great-aunt (Louisa Clementine Amore Baker) was married to Benjamin Baker who was a Justice of the Peace in Coshocton, Ohio before 1919. (Source information from his obituary published in “The Coshocton Tribune”, Coshocton, Ohio, Page 8, May 21, 1936)

My maternal grandfather, Glen Roy Johnson, Sr., was elected to the Fairfield (now a part of Fairborn), Greene County, Council in 1936 and was instrumental in getting a sewage plant builtHe was a Democrat in his younger years and in his later life affiliated with the Republican party.  He met Richard Nixon about 1972-1973 when he was in Washington D.C. and toured the White House.  (Source information – personal knowledge)

My first cousin, four times removed, John Goul (son of Christian and Ruth Lawson Goul, grandson of my 4th great-grandfather), first vote was cast for John Charles Fremont – the first candidate of the Republican party - who ran against James Buchanan.  John also voted twice for President Lincoln and although he was sought after to run for office in his locale, he refused to have his name put up for any political office.  John’s father, Christian Goul, was a Whig until the formation of the Republican party and then became a life-long Republican. (Source information from “Beers History of Champaign County, Ohio”)

My grandmother’s brother, John Alfred Wilt, was a Republican. (Source information – Vesta C. Johnson)

My 2nd cousin, 3 times removed, George Lewis House, served on the Deshler, Ohio city council and the school board before 1906.  His political affiliation is unknown. (Source information: Jeromey Ward)

My 9th great-grandfather, Richard Treat (d. 1669), represented the settlement of Wethersfield, Hartford County, Connecticut in the first general court in 1637; was a Colonial grand juror in 1643; elected to the general court in 1644 (and was re-elected many times); and was an Assistant Magistrate of the Colony from 1658-1665. (Source information from “The Hollister Family in America”.  Compiled by Lafayette Wallace Case M.D.; Chicago, Fergus Printing Company; 1886).

My maternal grandmother, Vesta Christena Wilt Johnson, was born prior to the passage of the 20th Amendment.  She voted in almost every election after that.  My parents have both voted Democratic most of their lives. 

When I was in 6th grade and Richard Nixon was running for his second term in office, I pasted Nixon/Agnew stickers on my bedroom door so my mom had to see them each time she walked by.  So when Nixon won over McGovern, I teased her mercilessly.  Needless to say, during the Watergate scandal, she had the last laugh over me.  I have voted both Democratic and Republican since I turned 18 and don’t consider myself affiliated with either party.  I am a proponent of voter rights and urge others to vote in order to have a voice in the future of our great nation.  I thoroughly believe that our forefathers and foremothers fought long and hard – either on the battlefield, in elected offices and as Suffragettes – in order to give us that right.  It should not be something we turn our nose up and deny because apathy solves nothing.  To be part of the solution, I believe – as so many of my ancestors – that we must all be active in the future of our community, our school, our city, our state, and our national government – either by voting or running for office in order to affect the change we look toward.

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A fellow genea-blogger, Thomas MacEntee from Destination: Austin Family posted this article about candy from his childhood. Without actually challenging anyone or considering it a meme, he said if other genea-bloggers had time this week – to post something about what candy we ate as kids.

So I went to the link Thomas listed showcasing different candy. My all time favorite candy is Hershey bars (plain, with almonds, Mr. Goodbar and Special Dark). Then M&M’s plain comes in a close second followed closely by Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups.

But what were the “odd” or unusual items of candy that I liked? Circus Peanuts! I remember getting a bag of these and eating half of the bag! Others include: Lemon/Orange/Lime slices; Mint Toothpicks (kids at our school used to have moms who would soak toothpicks in cinnamon oil too!); Pixy stix; Raisinettes; Zagnut and Zero bars.

I am not a fan of Tootsie Rolls, Good-n-Plenty (although I like regular black licorice), anything Caramel (although I like Caramel sauce and caramel flavor); Sugar Babies or Sugar Daddy.

I don’t really eat candy much anymore and when I do, I go for the chocolate bars with 70%-80% cacao since that is supposed to be better for cholesterol than regular chocolate.

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Kathryn Lake Hogan, of LOOKING4ANCESTORS offered a Fun Friday challenge that dares us to comment on at least 10 blogs – some favorites and some new.

I’ve been catching up on my genea-blog reading and trying to comment on those I’ve read.  This is my list:

1. footnoteMaven on the post Maria Bash and the Spirit Hoax

2. Creative Gene on the post Blog Action Day 2008 – Poverty

3. The Educated Genealogist on the post Practicing What I Preach

4. Heritage Happens on this post It Tickles My Funny Bone (A new blog to me)

5. In My Life on this post The Green Chair (A new blog to me)

6. Life’s Journey on this post Japanese Cherry Trees around the Washington Tidal Basin (A new blog to me)

7. Thomas 2.0 – Genealogy on his list of Surnames. Thomas new blog is new to me although I greatly enjoy reading Destination: Austin Family

8. Walking the Berkshires on this post Halcyon Days

9. Moultrie Creek on this post Land of the Trembling Earth

10. Genealogy Traces on this post Lucy Puckett and Cowart Children Die From 1918 Influenza (New to me blog)

So I urge to you go check out these blogs and the posts and please leave comments where ever you visit!  Care to leave me a comment?

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Apparently, Randy at GeneaMusings started a meme. He tagged Jasia at Creative Gene, who in turn tagged me! Before I write out mine, you can go to Jasia’s post and read her answers. Or go to Randy’s post and read his.

Okay, here goes!

10 Years Ago I:
1. Was waiting for my oldest daughter to graduate high school
2. Had been working at my (present) job 9 months
3. Was planning to attend my 20th high school reunion
4. Made some of my own clothes
5. Enjoyed making homemade bread and egg noodles

5 Things on Today’s “To Do” List: (will update as I complete!)
1. Run Errands
2. Update Web sites
3. Plan my Bible Study Lesson
4. Send an anniversary card to my sister & brother-in-law
5. Watch the last Presidential Debate

5 Snacks I Enjoy:
1. Jalapeno bombers from Church’s chicken
2. Frozen Yogurt
3. McDonald’s Chocolate shakes
4. Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte
5. Swiss Cheese

5 Places I Have Lived:
1. Beavercreek, Ohio
2. Lewisville, Texas
3. Denton, Texas
4. Grapevine, Texas
5. Kettering, Ohio

5 Jobs I’ve Had:
1. Prep for a Catering Company
2. Waitress
3. Graphic Artist/Designer
4. Clerk
5. After Market Sales Rep

5 Genea-bloggers I’m Passing This On To:
1. Jeanna at RootsReading
2. A. Spence at Spence-Lowry Family History
3. Nikki-ann at Notes of Life
4. M. Diane Rogers at CanadaGenealogy or ‘Jane’s Your Aunt’
5. Janet Iles at Janet the researcher

Please post your Meme and tag others!

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Blog Action Day is October 15th and (in my opinion) couldn’t have come at a more appropriate time. Not only due to the current circumstances of the United States’ and the World’s economic situation but because October has generally been the month of the year when horrible things have happened to the stock market.

In the news of late, there is a lot of blame going around.  Is it the banks’ fault?  Is it the mortgage companies’ fault?  Is it Washington’s fault?  Is it the fault of those who are so greedy or seem to want more than they can possibly afford?  Is it just the fault of circumstances beyond our control?  Instead of pointing fingers and dismissing any responsibility we, as individuals might have, it’s time to focus on the positive. 

We are in a positon now to change our own behavior – to learn from not only our personal history but the history of our forebearers.  I didn’t live through the Great Depression of the 1930s, but my parents, grandparents and great-grandparents did.  Through their values, actions and stories, I learned many things. 

Even after the Depression, my grandparents always kept a stock of items that at one time had been hard to come by or had been rationed during World War II (paper and canned goods).  There would be packages upon packages of toilet paper, paper towels, napkins, canned food, dry cleaner bags, re-usable gift wrap, foil, and plastic bags in their closets, pantry and spare bedrooms.  To this day there is a box in my mother’s basement that is filled with dry cleaner bags and saved gift wrap.  Not only were they stocked up but they were saving money by reusing items instead of disposing of so much that would just clog our landfills (this is a pre-recycling era).

My paternal grandparents lived in Coshocton County, Ohio – close to Appalachia and the mining towns.  In fact, my grandfather, Lloyd Amore, some of his brothers and nephews, were miners at one time.  How my grandparents managed to feed all of their children during that time, I don’t know.  They probably didn’t have too much to begin with other than land, a home, basic necessities, and a will to work hard.

My maternal grandparents were part of the military network.  My grandfather, Glen R. Johnson, had begun serving his country during World War I and by 1930 were living in Ohio close to (what was then called) Wright Field (now Wright Patterson Air Force Base).  They were able to receive medical treatment and their groceries from the military services.  My grandparents tried to live a debt-free life except when it came to buying a home and probably a car which I’m sure came from living through the Great Depression.

My great-grandmother, Martha (Stern) Clawson, moved to Washington State from the Midwest before the Stock Market crash of ’29.  She had a garden and there were animals that were slaughtered for meat so they didn’t go hungry. 

As I don’t have too much “fleshed out” information about any ancestors that immigrated from Europe, I can only imagine that they moved from their homeland due to economic, religious, and social reasons.

Today, as we watch stocks plummet and listen to the dire news reports, we can all pledge that when we recover as individuals, that we’ll move forward with a goal to better our situation.  It’s very unpopular to forego the use of cable, digital TV, or sattelite.  What would we watch on the television?  Give up the cell phone with all its bells and whistles?  What happens if someone needs to get in touch with me?  Wait before running out to buy that new appliance, car, electronic toy, or furniture?  How will I compete with the Jones’?  Buy my groceries using coupons, rebates and shopping guides?  Buy clothing or other items from garage sales or resale shops?  What will my neighbors think?  Hang my clothes out to dry on nice and warm days instead of wasting energy drying them?  That takes too much time!  Take a vacation somewhere local or at a more frugal destination instead of that cruise or Disney World Family vacation?  The kids will be upset!

For one thing – we’ve all lived without a lot of things before.  I grew up before cell phones were even around (let alone answering machines!).  People called back!  We had others on emergency lists in case we couldn’t be reached.  We weren’t tied to the office 24 hours a day! 

Libraries have DVDs and movies that can be borrowed.  When regular shows are in reruns and nothing else is on, we throw in a movie to watch as a family.  Better yet – turn the television off (saving energy) and do something as a family – take a walk, ride bikes, play a game, sit outside and enjoy kids being kids!

If your appliance, furniture, etc. isn’t broken, why do you need a new one?  Just to keep up with your friends and neighbors?  So when they go bankrupt and their properties are foreclosed on, will you also try to keep up with them?

Memories are made by what you do – not the most elaborate vacation in the world.  How long do you want to be paying off the credit charges on that once in a lifetime destination? 

It’s time we all take responsibility – not only for our own greed and indebtedness that places so many in danger of bankruptcy and foreclosure, but for the solution to get back to the basics.  To pull together without playing the blame game.  And as our forebearers before us, we can be just as patriotic by pulling together for the good of our country as well as the good of those who will come after us.

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Tomorrow is Blog Action Day with the theme of “Poverty”. Please click the link in order to go to the web site. There will be links to many blogs – not just genealogy. I urge you to go read the posts to see what everyone’s saying!

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Location: a cemetery in Coshocton County

Time of Day: Broad daylight – middle of the day

Weather: Warm

Event:  While looking for an ancestor’s grave, the day suddenly turned cool and shadows were splayed over the headstones.  The feeling was that the area was “haunted.”

True or False?

UPDATE: This post is TRUE – although I reported it second-hand!   When my cousin, Billy, went to Orange Grove Cemetery (also known as Richmond Cemetery) in Coshocton County to take pictures of Frances (Price) Amore’s gravestone (she was the first wife of my 2nd gr-grandfather, William Amore), he said the cemetery was very spooky.  The town close to the cemetery hasn’t seen much activity for almost 100 years.  He said it became quite eery and chilly on a warm day and didn’t spend too long lingering.

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