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Randy Seaver, of Genea-Musings, posted his SNGF via Michael John Neill’s RootDig post, 10 Signs You Have Genealogy OCD, and asked fellow geneabloggers to post their own 10 Signs of Genealogy OCD.  So here are mine:

  1. You overhear people at church, the supermarket, or standing in any line, mention they are headed to Connecticut, Michigan, Ohio, or Indiana for vacation and tell them that you have ancestors buried there.
  2. You see an ancestral name on one of your fellow geneablogger’s websites or blog and ask them for a gedcom in order to determine if you are distantly related.
  3. Your spouse asks you if you know anyone buried there each time you pass a cemetery.
  4. You check for library books that mention your ancestor’s regiment in the Civil War in hopes of finding a picture that he might be in.
  5. You read everything you can about Abraham Lincoln because the story passed down mentions that your great-grandfather shook hands with him in hopes of figuring out where, when and how that might have occured.
  6. You check familysearch.org several times a day hoping that there are new or updated databases for Ohio and Indiana.
  7. You pester your local library about getting Ancestry Library edition because your 6 month free trial from your FTM 2011 software ran out and you really only got to use it for about 30 days.
  8. You schedule your Friday nights around “Who Do You Think You Are?” when they have new shows.
  9. Your family knows your genealogy “happy dance” all too well and scatter before you can tell them why you are excited and what new information you’ve found.
  10. The only genealogy information your family wants to hear about is when there are scandals involved – and the closer the ancestor – the better!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this – have you seen yourself in any of mine?

 

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With the spring semester of college behind me and a couple of my “volunteer” jobs winding down, I’ve been doing some serious research for the last month.  My “free” subscription to Ancestry will be ending at the end of this month, so I’m scouring it for last minute tidbits. One thing I’ve realized is that with my time short, I’m grabbing the image and the source information and will transcribe later.  That is mainly when I find the census images.  I can list occupation, residence, etc. all later.  I do make sure I’ve listed my sources – that way I have a way to look for it at another time if need be.

Some of the people I’ve located information for aren’t in my direct line, but rather collateral family members who hadn’t been located past a certain time.  Databases – besides Ancestry – that I’ve used include: Rootsweb, Familysearch, Find a Grave, and county websites. 

This week I’ve taken a break from my own line.  An older couple at my church came into the office (I work for my church) and we proceeded to talk about the husband’s father and grandfather.  They mentioned they didn’t know much about that side of the family – so there I was, offering my research services.  That afternoon after the wife sent me information she did know, I started finding census records and naturalization records.  It feels good to accomplish something.  I’m hoping to give them a report in another week.  I think taking a break from my own research will give me a fresh perspective when I get back to it.

I’ve also enjoyed reading the blogs of those who attended the Southern California Genealogy Society Jamboree over the past weekend.  I wasn’t able to listen to any of the lectures that were streamed live.  The pictures I’ve seen showed many of my geneablogger “friends” having a great time – maybe too good of a time!

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The genealogical version of this disorder usually happens during research.  For the last several days I’ve been actively entering sources into my family tree database (FTM 2011).  I decided the best place to start would be my parents.  Since my father was born before the 1930 Census was taken, I thought I’d find that and enter the information.  This is what happened:

Ok, so I’m looking for Grampa Amore in the 1930 census. I’ll click on the US Federal Census database in Ancestry and from there choose 1930.  So now I’ll enter Lloyd Amore, lived in Coshocton County, Ohio and make sure to restrict all to exact matches.  Search.  What? Nothing?  Hmmm.  Maybe I should put choose restrict to exact matches and similar spellings for the first name because I’ve seen his name spelled with one “L”.  Still nothing.  Ok, well let’s try William because in several spots that’s what he lists as his first name instead of middle name.  Well, there’s my great-grandfather. 

Do I have the 1930 Census information for him?  Not really.  I have the year but I want to put the exact date the census was taken.  Click through to the original image – save to the computer.  Now I’ll just make sure that I add this source to everyone in the household.  Oh, look, someone’s name is spelled wrong. I’ll leave a comment so it can get fixed.  There’s several things over to the right that look like they pertain to my gr-grandfather.  Wow – what’s that?  Civil War registration for Ohio?  That must have been for his father – my 2nd great-grandfather.  That’s new.  I need to look at that.  I should go ahead and enter that information and source before I forget.

I don’t have exact dates of some of the censuses for him.  Maybe those items on the right will help me find what I need.  Do I have the Find A Grave information for him?  I’ll look at Find A Grave just to make sure that no other persons in my Amore branch have been added lately.  Let me click on my Grandma Amore’s listing.  I haven’t linked her with her parents yet. I better do that now before I forget.

Time has gone by and I realize that I’m linking children with their parents on Find A Grave.  By the time I return back to my Grampa Amore – still never finding the 1930 census for him, a couple of hours have passed and I realize that it’s way past my bedtime.

So – I did manage to get some things organized in my database and online, but I’m not being very linear about it!  As Scarlett O’Hara said, “Tomorrow is another day.”

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Our Saturday Night Genealogy Fun assignment from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings, and based on Katie O’s post You Might Be a Genealogist If . . .”>You Might Be a Genealogist If . . . on Where You Came Fromblog, for this Saturday is Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – You Might Be a Genealogist if . . .. We were to make up our own sayings. Immediately several came to mind.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you are driving on vacation and see a billboard touting a county of that state and you say “I know people buried there!” (to which your spouse would reply – “And do you speak to them often?” – yes, this has happened to me!)

You might be a genealogist if . . . you get excited when people show up at your workplace (a church) and inquire about what information there might be about their ancestors who founded the congregation and you start pulling out all the history information, rolls, and other stuff (work? what work?)

You might be a genealogist if . . . you don’t realize how glazed over your siblings or children’s eyes get when you start telling them about the latest connection you’ve documented.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you see a familiar surname on another blog and contact the author to see if they share a common ancestor with you.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you always steer the conversation at family events to dates, times, names, and who has the family bible, marriage certificate from the gr-grandparents, or addresses of distant cousins who might have what you are looking for.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you choose to write the obituary for a close family member in order to list all the first and middle names and relatonships of the survivors and deceased parents, siblings, as well as all of their jobs, education, and hobbies so future generations won’t have to guess at any of that.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you know which libraries in a twenty mile radius have Ancestry Library edition in case you need to go use it.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you get excited and offer all sorts of help when a friend or acquaintence happens to mention in passing that someday they’d like to start doing genealogy research.

That’s mine – and yes, all of the above are true!

Thanks Katie and Randy – that was fun!

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As I’ve been combing through pages and pages upon MORE pages of public Family Trees people have uploaded to Ancestry, I’ve discovered quite a bit of incorrect dates, places, spouses, children, etc. (hard to believe, I know!) I decided that the best way to either have the information corrected – or at least to make sure others realize that there are errors, is to leave comments giving documentation and sources for the correct facts.

So my Tuesday Tip is this – leave a comment wherever you find what I like to call “fictional” information – especially on Ancestry (but on any website you find with inaccuracies) – so others will have a better view of the correct information.

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This past weekend as I perused newspaper articles in Ancestry, I ran across a boatload of information concerning some distant cousins and an in-law of one of my great uncles.

Susan Peterson posted on her blog, Long Lost Relatives, an article, What To Do With Skeletons in the Closet” on February 26, 2011. She asked some pertinent questions (I urge you to go and read what she posted).  When I ran across all the information that made it abundantly clear that not only does our family have skeletons in the closet, but some scandals, and then those who are just plain screwed up, I realized that I would have to answer those questions.  My belief is that if the involved individuals are deceased – and more importantly – that the next generation is also deceased, and if the information is a matter of public record – especially when it was in the newspaper or on a document that anyone could obtain, then I will tell the story.  If there are truly sensitive aspects, I won’t lay them out in such detail, but respect the fact that there are possible descendents who either don’t know or have chosen not to acknowledge such behavior. 

A little over a year ago, I wrote Georgia On My Mind about my great-grandfather’s niece, Georgia Amore. This weekend I’ve learned some new information in addition to bits and pieces I’ve discovered since I wrote that. Soon, you’ll see that post again – with all the newest items added!

Many years ago when I first started my genealogical journey, a cousin mailed me some information – before either of us were proficient at scanning – and my email system back then wouldn’t even allow attachments. If it had, I’m sure it would have taken a very long time to download as I was still on dial up. One of the news clippings he mailed to me concerned someone who died in prison fairly recently in genealogy time (the 1970s). The man had the same last name as my paternal grandmother’s maiden name. Neither of us had heard of him or even if he was part of “our” House family. Fast forward ten years and I’ve made a connection – and a pretty sad one at that. Some of you might remember the series I wrote about my grandmother’s brother, Alva Lester House, – Lester’s Despair – Part One and More Tragedy for Lester House, concerning several losses that he experienced during his life.  The news clipping concerns Lester’s son and his grandsons.  After I assemble all of the new items, I will write a post about what I’ve learned.

Another news item that caught my eye, was about my great-uncle’s sister-in-law.  I found it only because I’d put my maiden name as a keyword to search Coshocton newspapers.  I saw the name “Mayme Amore” (first name spelled incorrectly) and wondered what it was about.  She was married to my grandfather’s brother, Roy. (Yes, a real consanquity chart would say that Roy is my grand-uncle, but as I’ve mentioned before, I grew up having him referred to as my great uncle.)  I clicked on the news article and it was about Mamie testifying at her sister’s trial.  Whoa!  What? A trial?  What sort of trial?  And that my dear readers, is something you’ll have to ponder for awhile – but I will give you the answer and all the particulars soon!

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My fellow geneablogger, Randy Seaver, of Genea-Musings has written several wonderful articles on Sources in Family Tree Maker 2011. The information has been very informative and has helped me immensely! Thanks, Randy!

I’m hoping that he or someone else can help me with a few other tidbits related to FTM 2011:

  1. In previous versions I could filter the individual list by women’s married name.  This really helps when I’m on Find a Grave and come across a transcription.  Sometimes it doesn’t list the maiden name of the woman, so in FTM 2011, I’m left to scan through several of the males to see if the wife has the same name as the person I found.  The previous way, I could find the woman more easily.  So my question – how do I filter by married name? Or is this even possible in FTM 2011?
  2. Okay – maybe that’s the extent of my observations right now!  I had wondered about the medical information and cause of death that I had entered in a previous version, but I’ve located that information as it shows up under the individual facts.

If anyone can help answer question #1  (Randy?!), I’d appreciate it!

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