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These are the posts, authors and blogs that I recommend for the week January 7-13, 2012.  Please go visit, leave a comment, and put them on your favorites list!

Preparing for RootsTech 2012 by Elyse Doerflinger of Elyse’s Genealogy Blog. This will be her first time at RootsTech and the first time she will get to visit Salt Lake City and the Family History Library. Elyse writes about her anticipation!

Denise Levenick blogs about the treasures she found when she carefully examined items in a box in Lessons From the Archive #2: Maintain Order at The Family Curator. You may also know Denise as “Miss Penelope Dreadful”.

Is It April 2nd Yet? by Ruth of Ruth’s Genealogy explains what she plans to do on that date (or soon after). Don’t have it marked on your calendar yet? You should!

Greta Koehl seems to have some experience with the “Oh, Look it’s Shiny” disorder too. Her humorous post, How NOT to Jump Start Your Genealogy can be found at Greta’s Genealogy Blog.

Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak (no, that’s not a misprint!) did a Genealogy Round Up January 12 at Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak’s Roots World.

One of the new (to me) genealogy blogs I’m following now is Leaves & Branches by Melissa D. She is a fellow Buckeye and her research includes Brown County, Ohio (where my Johnson and Shields ancestors lived before traveling on to Rush County, Indiana).

And as always you can always check out Randy’s Seaver’s “Best of . . .” on Genea-Musings when he posts it on Sunday.

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At one time I had tons of genea-blogs that I bookmarked and read every day, but when my daily schedule became too busy, I stopped reading many of them. Not because I didn’t like them, because I did, and many still provided good advice or stories.  I just had to decide which ones were more important and could fit into my schedule.

Those I read on a daily basis include:

Genea-Musings because Randy always has good tips, a little humor thrown in at times, and writes consistently each and every day. I enjoy the Saturday Night Genealogy Fun that he posts each Saturday afternoon and the Best of . . . posts that he writes on Sunday.

Ruth’s Genealogy. It used to be Bluebonnet Country Genealogy but has undergone some changes lately. Please go visit Ruth and see what wonderful renovations she has made!

Kinexxions by Becky Wiseman. She has spent a good deal of time traveling the country, posting about her travels, as well as the research she was able to accomplish during her two (yes, TWO) trips to Salt Lake City in the last year!

Reflections from the Fence by Carol. I started reading this blog after Becky Wiseman posted on her blog about meeting up with Carol and her husband, “Man”, during her first visit to SLC. This couple has spent the better part of the year traveling out west, and Carol has written many posts about “The Trip” and inserted wonderful photos. Almost feels as if you are with them!

Blogs that I try to get to on a semi-monthly basis (a few times a month) include:

Jasia’s Creative Gene blog.

Donna Pointkouski’s What’s Past is Prologue. Donna always inserts her own brand of humor and insight!

Becky Jamison’s Grace and Glory.

footNote Maven’s footnoteMaven. Unfortunately, fM has had some personal issues to deal with for several months and she hasn’t posted as often as I’m sure she wanted to. I’m sure she would say that she’s doing what she wants to be doing now (except for getting over a recent auto accident). Many have sent prayers and good thoughts to fM and Mr. M, and we will continue to do so.

There are several more that I read on a consistent basis but I wanted to highlight those above. However, in my last post, I urged readers to go check out some blogs and posts, and I will be taking my own advice and try to read more frequently.

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Since I’m attempting to get back on a routine of posting consistently, I wanted to highlight some of the interesting blog posts I’ve read this week. Please check them out!

Jasia at Creative Gene has posted the Carnival of Genealogy, 113th edition (A Dickens Christmas). Ten geneabloggers contributed to the COG (including moi).

Randy Seaver at Genea-Musings posted a series of articles about Finding Census Records at Archives.com – you can read them here, here, and here. These posts have some helpful tips about searching the UK Census records.

Miriam at AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestorswelcomed in the New Year with her post 2012 – Out With the Old, In With the New!. For those who enjoyed reading her blog, she explains her partial absence over the last year aside from doing Scanfest posts. This is a truly moving story!

Judy at The Legal Genealogist posted Docking an Entail – you are now wondering what an “entail” is and why would you “dock” it, right? No? Then you must already know what it means! For those who don’t or who want to know, go read. Oh, just read her entire blog! It’s brand new that began on January 1, 2012! Welcome to the geneablogging community, Judy!

If I didn’t pick your post (or blog), please forgive me. I’m just now starting to get back to reading on a regular basis. These are the ones I happened to stumble upon this past week.

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A comment left on one of my posts mentions a family that I have never heard of and can’t begin to understand exactly why it was left. The commenter mentions a lady whose family they are searching for and goes on to describe relatives and children of this woman. Apparently someone looking for that particular family saw the comment (probably after googling the name) and left another comment – which is still unpublished and then another comment was left – also unpublished. I had responded to the original comment that I wasn’t related to that family and believed they had left comments on the wrong blog post.

After looking at all three of these comments, I have decided to write this blog post about them. Hopefully, those who are searching for the same people will be able to contact each other and get more information.

Here is the first comment that is published written by “Eliza” at email address – iceelizabethe@yahoo.com on September 8, 2009:

“I came across a posting for the family of Cassie Whittlesey.
No other information other than her husband’s name.
LDS church member from Spokane, Washington area.
Cassie Whittlesey father’s name was Asa Gore, and his father was Wm G. Gore. His first wife’s name was Casey Warren, also listed in the LDS church in Los Angelos Calif.
They were married April 6th, 1833 in ? MS. They had one daughter married a Traxler from Rankin Ms. Mary Gore Traxler. Wm G. Gore’s second wife was Elender maiden name Unknown. She was in fact a full blooded Cherokee.
She was not of the Hennigan family. She is other another group.
Wm G. Gore family is unknown also.
Cassie Whittlesey mother was Anna Slena Slaydon Gore.
The Slaydons were from the Indian Village of Leon Texas, in Cherokee County Texas. Asa Gore had 5 daughters and 2 sons. 3 daughters moved from La to Calif.
His son Willie Ethan Gore’s boat was shot and sunk in the Phillipines during WWII, and listed as MIA and a marker is listed placed in the Midway Islands for his patoon and him.
Would like to know what Elender Gore maiden name was, and no it was not Hennigan. This was another William and Ellen Gore family, whom this Ellen Gore was previously married to a Harrall man from GA.”

The next comment left was from Richard Davenport at email address – klingon1@sbcglobal.net on July 6, 2010:

“I am sitting next to the daughter of Cassie. Her name is Olga Bearden. She is 92 years old. I have a copy of her father’s death certificate and she has a large book of Whittlesey history. Please feel free to contact me and I can get you in contact with her by phone as she has no computer. She lives in Dallas, Texas.”

And the final comment was left by B. Alton Cooper at email address – roscoebeauregard@ymail.com on September 14, 2011:

“critical…I am a decendent of William G and Ellen Gore…I grew up in Bancroft LA, totally unknowing of these people, as my grandfather JESSE GORE, knew of him but no more..Only after searching for info on my grandmother Jessie (Wingate/Neely) Gore-Cooper, did I learn of these people, and was told as child of Cherokee blood…I was given the name Wah Wah at birth, to honor that…I can be reached at Roscoebeauregard@ymail.com, or at roscoebeauregard/facebook…I am deeply indebted to a distant cousin of Sarah Jane Gore/Bivens…who started her own quest for the hertiage…Two daughers married Franks, we have located their graves, and grew up with one family, without knowledge of the kinship (bivens communtiy)….also Warden (Susan), whose house I play at many times as a child, never knowing that farmstead was of a gore, a sister to my g/grandfather…thank you would like to discuss partiulars with you ….b alton cooper/roscoebeauregard to honor those I grew up about…thanks..”

If you are one of these commenters – or have information that could help them – please shoot them an email and help them out!  Unfortunately, I do not have any information and I am not related to any of these people (nor am I looking for them). Thanks!

UPDATE: I believe that these persons were searching for a woman named Mary Gore Traxler (let’s see how many more people find my blog now!) – and came across my blog because my Dad’s uncle – Clarence Wesley Amore married Mary Ann Traxler. Mary’s father was John Traxler and her mother was Mary Tunney.  So my Mary is NOT the Mary the others were searching. Whew! At least one mystery is solved!

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With the spring semester of college behind me and a couple of my “volunteer” jobs winding down, I’ve been doing some serious research for the last month.  My “free” subscription to Ancestry will be ending at the end of this month, so I’m scouring it for last minute tidbits. One thing I’ve realized is that with my time short, I’m grabbing the image and the source information and will transcribe later.  That is mainly when I find the census images.  I can list occupation, residence, etc. all later.  I do make sure I’ve listed my sources – that way I have a way to look for it at another time if need be.

Some of the people I’ve located information for aren’t in my direct line, but rather collateral family members who hadn’t been located past a certain time.  Databases – besides Ancestry – that I’ve used include: Rootsweb, Familysearch, Find a Grave, and county websites. 

This week I’ve taken a break from my own line.  An older couple at my church came into the office (I work for my church) and we proceeded to talk about the husband’s father and grandfather.  They mentioned they didn’t know much about that side of the family – so there I was, offering my research services.  That afternoon after the wife sent me information she did know, I started finding census records and naturalization records.  It feels good to accomplish something.  I’m hoping to give them a report in another week.  I think taking a break from my own research will give me a fresh perspective when I get back to it.

I’ve also enjoyed reading the blogs of those who attended the Southern California Genealogy Society Jamboree over the past weekend.  I wasn’t able to listen to any of the lectures that were streamed live.  The pictures I’ve seen showed many of my geneablogger “friends” having a great time – maybe too good of a time!

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Our Saturday Night Genealogy Fun assignment from Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings, and based on Katie O’s post You Might Be a Genealogist If . . .”>You Might Be a Genealogist If . . . on Where You Came Fromblog, for this Saturday is Saturday Night Genealogy Fun – You Might Be a Genealogist if . . .. We were to make up our own sayings. Immediately several came to mind.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you are driving on vacation and see a billboard touting a county of that state and you say “I know people buried there!” (to which your spouse would reply – “And do you speak to them often?” – yes, this has happened to me!)

You might be a genealogist if . . . you get excited when people show up at your workplace (a church) and inquire about what information there might be about their ancestors who founded the congregation and you start pulling out all the history information, rolls, and other stuff (work? what work?)

You might be a genealogist if . . . you don’t realize how glazed over your siblings or children’s eyes get when you start telling them about the latest connection you’ve documented.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you see a familiar surname on another blog and contact the author to see if they share a common ancestor with you.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you always steer the conversation at family events to dates, times, names, and who has the family bible, marriage certificate from the gr-grandparents, or addresses of distant cousins who might have what you are looking for.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you choose to write the obituary for a close family member in order to list all the first and middle names and relatonships of the survivors and deceased parents, siblings, as well as all of their jobs, education, and hobbies so future generations won’t have to guess at any of that.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you know which libraries in a twenty mile radius have Ancestry Library edition in case you need to go use it.

You might be a genealogist if . . . you get excited and offer all sorts of help when a friend or acquaintence happens to mention in passing that someday they’d like to start doing genealogy research.

That’s mine – and yes, all of the above are true!

Thanks Katie and Randy – that was fun!

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This past weekend as I perused newspaper articles in Ancestry, I ran across a boatload of information concerning some distant cousins and an in-law of one of my great uncles.

Susan Peterson posted on her blog, Long Lost Relatives, an article, What To Do With Skeletons in the Closet” on February 26, 2011. She asked some pertinent questions (I urge you to go and read what she posted).  When I ran across all the information that made it abundantly clear that not only does our family have skeletons in the closet, but some scandals, and then those who are just plain screwed up, I realized that I would have to answer those questions.  My belief is that if the involved individuals are deceased – and more importantly – that the next generation is also deceased, and if the information is a matter of public record – especially when it was in the newspaper or on a document that anyone could obtain, then I will tell the story.  If there are truly sensitive aspects, I won’t lay them out in such detail, but respect the fact that there are possible descendents who either don’t know or have chosen not to acknowledge such behavior. 

A little over a year ago, I wrote Georgia On My Mind about my great-grandfather’s niece, Georgia Amore. This weekend I’ve learned some new information in addition to bits and pieces I’ve discovered since I wrote that. Soon, you’ll see that post again – with all the newest items added!

Many years ago when I first started my genealogical journey, a cousin mailed me some information – before either of us were proficient at scanning – and my email system back then wouldn’t even allow attachments. If it had, I’m sure it would have taken a very long time to download as I was still on dial up. One of the news clippings he mailed to me concerned someone who died in prison fairly recently in genealogy time (the 1970s). The man had the same last name as my paternal grandmother’s maiden name. Neither of us had heard of him or even if he was part of “our” House family. Fast forward ten years and I’ve made a connection – and a pretty sad one at that. Some of you might remember the series I wrote about my grandmother’s brother, Alva Lester House, – Lester’s Despair – Part One and More Tragedy for Lester House, concerning several losses that he experienced during his life.  The news clipping concerns Lester’s son and his grandsons.  After I assemble all of the new items, I will write a post about what I’ve learned.

Another news item that caught my eye, was about my great-uncle’s sister-in-law.  I found it only because I’d put my maiden name as a keyword to search Coshocton newspapers.  I saw the name “Mayme Amore” (first name spelled incorrectly) and wondered what it was about.  She was married to my grandfather’s brother, Roy. (Yes, a real consanquity chart would say that Roy is my grand-uncle, but as I’ve mentioned before, I grew up having him referred to as my great uncle.)  I clicked on the news article and it was about Mamie testifying at her sister’s trial.  Whoa!  What? A trial?  What sort of trial?  And that my dear readers, is something you’ll have to ponder for awhile – but I will give you the answer and all the particulars soon!

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