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Posts Tagged ‘Ohio’

After years of research and stumbling blocks too numerous to list, I think I’ve discovered more information about my 2nd great-grandmother, Charlotte Reed. The quick version of information I had include: she was born in 1828 in Ohio; she married my 2nd great-grandfather, William Amore, on May 15, 1851 in Coshocton County, Ohio; she is listed on the marriage records as Charlotte Imons; her grandson and several family members list her maiden name as Reed, not Imons; she died on October 9, 1862 in Coshocton, Ohio and is buried at Mt. Zion Cemetery in Coshocton County.

For years that was all the information I had uncovered. Taking a closer look at the Coshocton County Marriage records (Hunter, Miriam C. Coshocton County Marriages), I discovered a marriage record for Charlotte Reed and William Irwins for March 28, 1850. Okay, so if I go on the assumption that whoever transcribed the name, wrote Imons instead of Irwins for the marriage of Charlotte and William Amore.

I had located a Charlotte in the household of Zachariah Reed in 1850. William and Charlotte had a son named Zachariah born in 1860 and died not quite a year later. Recently, after doing some google searching for a Zachariah Reed in Muskingum or Coshocton Counties, I found more information. Zachariah and an unknown wife had two daughters, Charlotte and Matilda. Matilda married Elon I Imus about 1848 and had at least one daughter.

Zachariah was born in 1787 in Maryland and Matilda was born in 1827 in Maryland before the family moved to Ohio.

I really believe that this is Charlotte’s family and Zachariah Reed is my 3rd great-grandfather.  More documentation will be needed to accurately prove this theory – but it’s a lot more than I’ve had before!

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Margaret Maple is my third great-grandmother.  She is person #5208 in my Family Tree Maker database.  My relationship to her is as follows:

  1. Margaret Maple m. George Peter Werts on September 20, 1827.
  2. Their second child and son was William Washington Werts who married Louisa Bookless on August 24, 1852.
  3. William and Louisa’s second child and first daughter, Mary Angelina Werts, married William Henry Amore on December 14, 1872.
  4. Their fourth child and third son, William Loyd Amore, married Ella Maria House on April 11, 1903.
  5. Loyd and Ella’s seventh child and fifth son is my dad.

Margaret was born to William B. Maple and Mary Fuller on December 22, 1808 in Coshocton, Ohio.  The county of Coshocton was two years away from being created by authority of the State of Ohio.  By the 1820′s it was well on its way to being a major center of commerce due to the Canal. (Ohio History Central)

Margaret was the first wife of George Peter Werts. They had eight children: Julia Ann b. June 25, 1828; William Washington b. Dec. 25, 1829; John Jackson b. Feb. 6, 1831; Susanna b. Oct. 9, 1832;  Mary Jane b. Mar. 14, 1834; Jacob Henry b. Nov. 11, 1835; Catherine Shroyer b. Apr. 30, 1838; and George Peter Wesley b. Apr. 4, 1841.   After Margaret died in Muskingum County, Ohio, on May 13, 1851, her husband married two more times.

Her parents, William B. Maple, and Mary Fuller, married on January 4, 1800 in the area that would become Coshocton County.  Both of them had come to Ohio from their birthplace of Maryland.  William was born abt July 16, 1778 and Mary was born in April 1782.  Both of them died in Peoria, Illinois.

William was the son of Jacob Maple and Elizabeth Stanford who were married in Middlesex County, New Jersey on January 27, 1769 – many years before America would fight for her independence. 

Jacob was the son of Benjamin Maple Jr.  and Sarah Clare Lee who were married in probably New Jersey.  Benjamin was born about 1696 in Burlington County, New Jersey and Sarah was born in 1700 in New Brunswick, Middlesex County, New Jersey.  It has been reported that Benjamin was the Constable for New Brunswick, New Jersey in 1728.  He on November 26, 1777 in Windsor, Middlesex County, New Jersey.

Benjamin Jr. was the son of Benjamin Maple Sr. and Elizabeth Lee who married on June 4, 1695 in Burlington, New Jersey.  He was born in 1663 in Suffolk, England and died on May 13, 1727 in New Jersey.

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As I was going through the Ohio County Marriage Records on FamilySearch.org yesterday, I came across three listings for James E. House in Guernsey County, Ohio.  Two of them are known to me.  My great-grandfather, James Emory House, married Barbara Shryock on May 29, 1866.

 

They went on to have one son, Edward F. House, and two daughters – Belle Dora House and Lucina House.  Barbara (also called Barbary) died on July 10, 1872. 

Then the story goes that James had Frances Ogan keeping house for him – as told in a letter written by his youngest son, Alva Lester House, to my aunt Gertrude.

So Father got my mother to keep house for him after his wife died.  So him and Mother got married and they had 8 children.

James and Frances (Ogan) were married on May 26, 1873. 

Their first son, Florus Allen House (named after James’ father), was born a month prior to their marriage on April 21, 1873. 

And this is where it gets interesting.  When I clicked on the third entry for James E. House on the marriage records, it showed a marriage license issued on March 4, 1873, for James E. House and Elizabeth A. Meloy- it was never returned – and the couple didn’t get married. 

Curious!  In order to determine if this was my great-grandfather, I set about comparing signatures.

I looked at all three – since two of them were “documented” as true and correct (sources are the children of my great-grandfather and his two wives – Barbara and Frances) – then I needed to compare his signatures with the one on the license for Elizabet Meloy.

I looked at unique aspects – the curliques especially – to determine if the same person could have signed all three documents and voila!  It sure enough was!  So who was this Elizabeth Meloy?  How long had they known each other?  Did James even know that Frances was expecting his child very, very soon (within a month of the date of the license)?  Why didn’t he and Elizabeth get married? (On a personal note, I’m glad they didn’t or else I wouldn’t be here!) 

I set about trying to find out who this Elizabeth was.  It seemed that whomever wrote down the names on the licenses, didn’t check for spelling.  Either that or my great-grandfather was very bad at remembering spelling or names.  Instead of Barbara Shryock – she is listed as Barbary – which is what James wrote down on his pension application.  Instead of Frances or even “Frankie” – she is listed as Frank.  So that made me realize that Meloy could be a convoluted spelling for Malloy or Maloy.  After not finding any possible Meloy families in the census, I looked for Maloy families. 

James had grown up in Linton Township, Coshocton County, Ohio.  In the 1860 US Census, he is living with his parents (Florus and Julia House) in Linton Township, dwelling and family number 778.  Elizabeth Maloy, 9 years old, is living in the William and Louisa Maloy household in Linton Township, dwelling and family number 759.  In the 1870 US Census, Elizabeth is still living with her parents.  She is listed as age 18.  The family had moved to Monroe Township, Muskingum County, Ohio.  Since I have not been able to locate James and Barbara in the 1870 US Census, it is unknown where they were living.  What I do know is James’ parents, Florus and Julia, were married in Muskingum County – so perhaps Julia’s family still lived in the area and perhaps they visited them from time to time.  I would imagine that the families knew each other from some community function – church, school, or a social club.  Elizabeth was about 8 years younger than James.  She was three years younger than one of his sisters and two years older than another one. 

Further research on Elizabeth indicates that there was an Elizabeth Maloy who married James Parks on June 13, 1877 in Coshocton County, Ohio.  I can only assume that this is the same woman.

I’m still looking for more information.  Right now Elizabeth Meloy/Maloy is just as mysterious as she was when I found the marriage license!

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The genealogical version of this disorder usually happens during research.  For the last several days I’ve been actively entering sources into my family tree database (FTM 2011).  I decided the best place to start would be my parents.  Since my father was born before the 1930 Census was taken, I thought I’d find that and enter the information.  This is what happened:

Ok, so I’m looking for Grampa Amore in the 1930 census. I’ll click on the US Federal Census database in Ancestry and from there choose 1930.  So now I’ll enter Lloyd Amore, lived in Coshocton County, Ohio and make sure to restrict all to exact matches.  Search.  What? Nothing?  Hmmm.  Maybe I should put choose restrict to exact matches and similar spellings for the first name because I’ve seen his name spelled with one “L”.  Still nothing.  Ok, well let’s try William because in several spots that’s what he lists as his first name instead of middle name.  Well, there’s my great-grandfather. 

Do I have the 1930 Census information for him?  Not really.  I have the year but I want to put the exact date the census was taken.  Click through to the original image – save to the computer.  Now I’ll just make sure that I add this source to everyone in the household.  Oh, look, someone’s name is spelled wrong. I’ll leave a comment so it can get fixed.  There’s several things over to the right that look like they pertain to my gr-grandfather.  Wow – what’s that?  Civil War registration for Ohio?  That must have been for his father – my 2nd great-grandfather.  That’s new.  I need to look at that.  I should go ahead and enter that information and source before I forget.

I don’t have exact dates of some of the censuses for him.  Maybe those items on the right will help me find what I need.  Do I have the Find A Grave information for him?  I’ll look at Find A Grave just to make sure that no other persons in my Amore branch have been added lately.  Let me click on my Grandma Amore’s listing.  I haven’t linked her with her parents yet. I better do that now before I forget.

Time has gone by and I realize that I’m linking children with their parents on Find A Grave.  By the time I return back to my Grampa Amore – still never finding the 1930 census for him, a couple of hours have passed and I realize that it’s way past my bedtime.

So – I did manage to get some things organized in my database and online, but I’m not being very linear about it!  As Scarlett O’Hara said, “Tomorrow is another day.”

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If you have not read my previous articles: Lester’s Despair – Part One and More Tragedy for Lester House, then I urge you to do that before continuing.

I learned more about Lester and Mary’s (Besser) son, Jarold, than I really cared to know.  It was concerning why he was sent to the state mental hospital and to jail.  The morals charges were of the worst kind – out of regard for his living descendents I will not post the details.  I will, however, say that it is all spelled out in some newspaper accounts (so if they go looking, they will find the stories). 

Jarold and his wife, Margaret, had four sons.  I don’t believe they were very old before they were sent to live with foster families.  Since some of the sons are still living I will call them Son One, Son Two, Son Three and Son Four (again some of the events of which I will write about are all available to be found in newspaper reports). 

In the mid 1970s, Son Two and Son Three, along with at least one other young man, killed a man.  Apparently there was kidnapping and mutilation involved.  As I perused the newspaper articles, the nagging thought I had, was to wonder if the father’s actions towards his sons had any bearing on their emotional states as young men.  At least their grandfather, Lester House, had already passed away.  This new tragedy would have been more than enough for him after all that he had been through.

Son Two and Son Three were convicted of kidnapping and murder and sentenced to prison.  Son Three was killed in prison and Son Two is still incarcerated.  Son One passed away several years ago.  I haven’t uncovered any information on Son Four – so it seems he has left his family and past behind – and really who could blame him?

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Mary Angeline Werts Amore

Mary Angeline Werts was born to William Washington Werts and Louisa Bookless on February 16, 1855 in Linton Township, Coshocton County, Ohio.  Her father died when she was two years old leaving Lousia to raise Mary and her older brother, George.  In the 1860 Census both children are living with others.  In 1961 Louisa married John Simon and three years later they had a daughter, Sarah Ellen.  On December 14, 1872, Mary married William Henry Amore.  In 1881 Mary lost her brother, George.

Mary – known as “Annie” and “Henry” had seven children – a daughter first, followed by six sons (“Clemmie”, “Zade”, Roy, Lloyd, Rollo, Bert, and Clarence).  The family was very involved with the Salvation Army.  I just didn’t realize how involved Annie was until I ran across an article from the Coshocton Tribune dated December 14, 1941 (nine days after Annie passed away).

In the “Fife and Drum” column written by Al Cline, he stated, “Back a quarter century ago, at the Christmas times even before the first World war, you might have seen a tiny, birdlike woman, her face rosy with cold, standing on one of Coshocton’s snow-swept street corners, ringing a Salvation Army bell.”  He went on to state that before many people knew what the Salvation Army was is when she joined as one of its first members. She was called “Mother” Amore, and as Cline reported, “very few people knew her first name was Mary. And there is no record how many derelicts she took into her little house, gave a bed and breakfast and sent on their way, because the true spirit of Christmas was with Mother Amore the year round.”

There were many Sundays she walked from her home in Roscoe to the Salvation Army home so she wouldn’t miss a service. My great-grandmother (her son Lloyd was my grandfather) saw the new citadel finished in 1929 when she was in her 70s. Unfortunately that was about the time she fell and was hurt pretty bad.  The columnist reported that for more than ten years after her fall, Mother Amore was “an uncomplaining invalid, tied to her bed and crutch.”  Salvation Army Captain Douglas Bethune told Al Cline that he always had a strange feeling in her house; one that felt as if she was comforting him instead of the other way around when he came to call on her weekly after her fall.

Cline summed up his story by writing, “I guess this is a story of faith. Mother Amore had faith, like an imperishable little . . . flame, burning inside her and shining thru her eyes. It took faith and vision to help build the snug Salvation Army citadel, and it took faith to lie calmly in bed, at 86, and wait for the quiet touch of death.”

As I read that article, tears sprung from my eyes.  No, I didn’t know my great-grandmother in the traditional sense (I also did not know my grandfather as he died six years before I was born).  I didn’t even really know her through memories of others.  The only thing my dad has said is that she was in bed all the time.  He was an adult by the time she died – so perhaps I can find out more about this woman from him.

However, I did learn a lot about this woman, just from this article.  It told me that she didn’t complain about any hardship that she encountered.  Whether she learned this at a young age from losing her father and then her brother and being “farmed out” from her mother, I don’t know.  I have a sense that she seemed to always have a sense of purpose – helping people, nurturing them, giving hope to others, and bringing the word of God into the lives of those who didn’t know Him. 

I have three pictures of Annie – the picture above is one that my cousin, Sharon Amore Brittigan, uploaded to Ancestry.  The picture below is one that my family has also shared with me of Henry and Annie and their children.  One other photo I have shows the couple surrounded by loving family members on the occasion of the first Amore reunion held at their home.

Annie died on December 5, 1941 seven years after losing her husband, Henry. Her funeral was held in the Salvation Army citadel and she was buried in Roscoe Cemetery.

R.I.P. Great-grandmother (“Mother”) Amore.

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Summer in the mid-1960s (not sure which year).  This picture was taken at my paternal aunt’s home in Zanesville, Ohio.  Pictured left to right: my 1st cousin, June (my dad’s oldest sister’s daughter), my Aunt Eva and Uncle Bervil (my dad’s brother), my Aunt Gertrude (Dad’s oldest sister), Eric (June’s grandson), and me.  Notice the span of ages between my first cousin – who has a grandchild a little younger than me – and me!

I haven’t seen June or Eric since the real early 1970′s. The last time I saw my Aunt Gertie was in the summer of 1972.  I saw my Uncle Bervil and Aunt Eva for the last time in the late 1960′s.  Luckily, I am now in touch with their son, grandson’s, great-granddaughter’s, and their daughter.

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This past weekend as I perused newspaper articles in Ancestry, I ran across a boatload of information concerning some distant cousins and an in-law of one of my great uncles.

Susan Peterson posted on her blog, Long Lost Relatives, an article, What To Do With Skeletons in the Closet” on February 26, 2011. She asked some pertinent questions (I urge you to go and read what she posted).  When I ran across all the information that made it abundantly clear that not only does our family have skeletons in the closet, but some scandals, and then those who are just plain screwed up, I realized that I would have to answer those questions.  My belief is that if the involved individuals are deceased – and more importantly – that the next generation is also deceased, and if the information is a matter of public record – especially when it was in the newspaper or on a document that anyone could obtain, then I will tell the story.  If there are truly sensitive aspects, I won’t lay them out in such detail, but respect the fact that there are possible descendents who either don’t know or have chosen not to acknowledge such behavior. 

A little over a year ago, I wrote Georgia On My Mind about my great-grandfather’s niece, Georgia Amore. This weekend I’ve learned some new information in addition to bits and pieces I’ve discovered since I wrote that. Soon, you’ll see that post again – with all the newest items added!

Many years ago when I first started my genealogical journey, a cousin mailed me some information – before either of us were proficient at scanning – and my email system back then wouldn’t even allow attachments. If it had, I’m sure it would have taken a very long time to download as I was still on dial up. One of the news clippings he mailed to me concerned someone who died in prison fairly recently in genealogy time (the 1970s). The man had the same last name as my paternal grandmother’s maiden name. Neither of us had heard of him or even if he was part of “our” House family. Fast forward ten years and I’ve made a connection – and a pretty sad one at that. Some of you might remember the series I wrote about my grandmother’s brother, Alva Lester House, – Lester’s Despair – Part One and More Tragedy for Lester House, concerning several losses that he experienced during his life.  The news clipping concerns Lester’s son and his grandsons.  After I assemble all of the new items, I will write a post about what I’ve learned.

Another news item that caught my eye, was about my great-uncle’s sister-in-law.  I found it only because I’d put my maiden name as a keyword to search Coshocton newspapers.  I saw the name “Mayme Amore” (first name spelled incorrectly) and wondered what it was about.  She was married to my grandfather’s brother, Roy. (Yes, a real consanquity chart would say that Roy is my grand-uncle, but as I’ve mentioned before, I grew up having him referred to as my great uncle.)  I clicked on the news article and it was about Mamie testifying at her sister’s trial.  Whoa!  What? A trial?  What sort of trial?  And that my dear readers, is something you’ll have to ponder for awhile – but I will give you the answer and all the particulars soon!

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(Continued from The Box)

After I had opened the box, unwrapped the tissue paper to find my mom’s baby sister’s bonnet and removed the tissue paper, I saw a calendar at the bottom of the box.

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Carefully I lifted out the Calendar from 1927 and slowly flipped the pages.  When I found the month of June, there were notes on the page in my grandmother’s handwriting.

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June 9: Baby born – 10 a.m. hospital – 3# 4 – Lois Evelyn

June 13: 2#s 5

June 16: I came home – left baby

June 25: Fabitis

Week of June 26: Baby gaining back

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July 9: 3-4 1/2

July 15: I came home

July 16: Baby home – 3# 6

July 23: 3# 12 1/2

July 30: Same

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August 1: 3# 12 1/2 oz

August 6: 4 – 3

August 13:  4 – 7

August 20: 4 – 12 1/2

August 27: 4 – 7

August 30: 4 – 5

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September 3: 4 – 7

September 10: 4 – 8

September 12: cow’s milk

September 15: 4 – 13

September 17: 4 – 7

September 19: 4 – 5

September 22: SMA, 4 – 4

September 28: Back to hospital at 9 pm

September 30: Died at 5 pm

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October 2: We buried our dear baby 3 months, 3 weeks

October 18: At Hospital

October 20:  Operated for appendicitis & perineal op

October 22: Real ill

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Lois Evelyn Johnson’s Death Certificate

Birth: June 9, 1927
Death: Sept 30, 1927 at Miami Valley Hospital, Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio
Normal residence was in Fairfield (now part of Fairborn), Greene County, Ohio
Female, White, Single
Birthplace: Dayton, Ohio
Age at Death: 3 months, 4 days (this is incorrect just based on dates)
Father: Glenn (spelling incorrect) Johnson, born Anderson, Indiana
Mother: Vesta Wilt, born Noblesville, Indiana
Informant: Glen R. Johnson, Fairfield, Ohio
Death occurred at 6 pm
Cause of Death: 7 mo. premature birth; summer diarrhea, malnutrition
Place of Burial: Fairfield Cemetery, Oct 3rd 1927

It appears – based on calendar notes – that my grandmother was very vigilant about checking Lois’ weight and even changing what type of nutrition she was receiving.  Lois probably started out being breast-fed and then when she failed to gain enough, was switched to cow’s milk.  She did appear to gain some weight but then started to taper off again.  My grandmother then switched her to SMA Formula but that didn’t seem to help.  I believe the X’s at certain dates of Lois’ life probably indicated either the beginning of diarrhea or a dr. appointment. 

Talking to my mom a year ago, I discovered that Lois had been able to go home from the hospital.  I was always under the impression that she had to remain there.  Mom had told me that her baby sister had been put next to a heat source in order to keep her body temperature up. 

Lois Evelyn didn’t remain at Fairfield Cemetery.  Years later a family had lost their children in a fire (or some other calamity) and a call went out through the community for burial plots or money to help bury the children.  My grandparents gave up their plots and decided to remove their baby daughter to the cemetery they had chosen would be their final resting place.  Mom had told me several times the gruesome tale of how my grandmother had wanted to see her baby daughter one more time after she was disinterred and asked that her casket be opened.  Apparently she was pretty well preserved until the air touched her remains.  Lois was then interred – permanently – at Glen Haven Memorial Gardens in New Carlisle, Ohio.  Almost 40 years after she died, her parents joined her in eternal rest (in 1984 and 1985).  Now, though unfortunate, most of the family is together – lying close together in a very peaceful setting: Lois’ oldest brother and her next to oldest sister (my mother).  My aunt, the oldest daughter, is buried several miles away in the community’s Catholic cemetery.

Medical technology has come such a long way since 1927.  If Lois Evelyn had been born within the last 10-15 years, she would probably be well cared for and received the right nutrition.  Her gastric distress was probably due to her prematurity and she may have been placed on a feeding tube or receive IV nutrients. 

My grandmother spoke of Lois Evelyn often.  She never stopped mourning her last born child.  She had shown me one picture of the little one lying on a blanket.  I’ve not seen that photo again.  The picture I do have, I will not post.  It is her final picture – in her casket at her funeral.  A banner reading “Our Baby” is draped above her on the lid.  She was very, very tiny.  And for all these years, she’s been an angel.

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Rest in Peace, Lois Evelyn

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Randy Seaver (who is lacking a good internet connection now – he’s having to pay a horrible price for just a little bit of connection time) has still posted the Saturday Night Genealogy Fun: Ahnentafel Roulette on his blog, Genea-Musings.

1. How old is my father: 88

2. Divide that number by 4: 22

3. The person on my Ahnentafel chart that is #22 is: Evan Ogan (my note: Oh, of all the people!!!)

4. Three facts about that person:

  1. Evan, born 1785 in Culpepper County, Virginia, is the foster father of my paternal g-grandmother, Frances V. (Ogan) House. 
  2. He married Susannah Fritter in 1807.
  3. He is found living in Rich Hill, Muskingum County, Ohio in the 1850 Census; in Spencer, Guernsey County, Ohio in the 1860 Census; living with his son, Lot, in Meigs Twp, Muskingum County, Ohio in the 1870 Census.
  4. Evan died when he was 88 (abt. 1879) at the home of his youngest son in Meigs Twp, Muskingum County, Ohio (presumably that son was Lot) – cause of death was paralysis (according to his obituary).

So I listed 4 facts.  My great-grandmother, Frances Ogan, lived with Evan and Susannah since the 1850 Census – she was listed as Frances Foster.  I may never know whether or not Frances was related to them, if they knew her parents, or if the family lore is accurate: that she was left on a doorstep.

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