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(Written on Thursday, August 14th)

This morning, using John Wiley’s “How to Cite Sources” , I completed 68 source citations.  Actually it was easier than I thought.  I started with my grandchildren, then my children, my husband and myself, and on up the family tree.  I included citations on birth, baptisms, confirmations, graduations, marriages, occupations, associations, and residences.  So I’ve finished with a Platinum Medal in “Cite Your Sources” (Category 1).

Under Category 4 “Write! Write! Write! I’ve completed 4 tasks as of yesterday and achieved Gold Medal status.  I’m still working on D. Write a brief biographical sketch of one of your ancestors.

I hope to have more organization under Category 3 completed today.

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I am updating the list of ideas for the “Freaky Friday” challenge as I thought of something that truly is “Freaky” but didn’t fall within any of the categories I’d listed.  And since I started this challenge, I get to change the rules!  So here is the update.

Number 5: Submit information on actual events or photo or two that screams “Freaky” or “Friday” (or both!) and explain.

When I was about nine years old, a friend of my grandparents passed away.  Since my parents and I also knew the lady, it was expected that we attend the visitation.  As Mom was explaining exactly what I would see, I turned and gave her a quizzical look.  When she finished speaking, I replied, “But I’ve been to a funeral before.”  She said no, I’d never been to a funeral or inside a funeral home or been to a viewing before.  Yes I had, I argued.  The lady in the pink dress.  Mom just shook her head but didn’t say much after that. 

One of my earliest memories was of a small, white funeral home out in the country somewhere.  To this day I can still recall the flowers that grew on the trellis outside.  I can see the men in their white shirts and narrow black ties.  They had short hair and were standing outside in the sunshine.  The coffin was white but I was too little to see the lady inside.  Someone put a step stool down so I could stand on it.  As I peered inside at the lady, I remember she had on a pink dress and she had a head covering on – sort of like a hair net but it was opaque.  I distinctly remember thinking that it was my aunt.

My Aunt Genevieve died three years before I was born of inoperable brain tumors so I had never met her - let alone gone to her funeral.

Many years later when I was back in the Dayton area for a vacation, I was at my brother’s house, and we were talking about how we’d sometimes have deja vu.  He asked me if I’d ever had a dream (or vision) of a lady dressed in pink dress lying in a coffin.  I almost fell off the couch.  He went on to tell me his own version.  He remembered that she had on a pink nightgown and part of it wasn’t covering her stomach.  There were lots of black stitches running up and down her abdomen.  He always called her the “watermelon” woman because the stitches reminded him of watermelon seeds.  Our desciptions of the funeral home were also very similar.  Then he told me that our sister had mentioned something close to what we were describing.  I’ve never asked her if that’s true. 

All three of us also have a very heightened sense of deja vu.  My sister used to argue with my mom that she’d been somewhere before upon the first time she’d enter a house.  Mom finally gave up trying to argue with the unknown. 

Needless to say, my first actual time at a funeral home and being in the presence of someone who had died, did not bother me as it might for a small child.  I tend to think it’s because I had truly believed I’d already been through that first experience and the fear of the unknown was over. 

Freaky!

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Just a reminder that tomorrow is “Freaky Friday”.  If you post something, please let me know so I can give you a Shout Out!  Stay tuned for my 2nd entry!  It is pretty freaky! 

I’m also going to be looking for some sort of graphic to use.   Perhaps a week from now I’ll have something to use.

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Unfortunately I didn’t get much done in the way of research, sourcing or writing.  I had to spend two hours listening to a Webinar on doing the elementary school’s web site.  I’ve built two web sites and use a template to manage my high school class’ site, so most of it was pretty boring.  At least I can add that to my list of PTA Accomplishments!

I did spend some time reading many of the Genealogy blogs especially the posts on Stores of Yesteryear and other new tidbits of information.  There are some great writers out there!

Tomorrow I’m hoping to get some sourcing done and perhaps some scanning as well.

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(I’m a day late with this post!)

Lori Thornton at Smokey Mountain Family History asks: What’s your favorite bookstore? Is it an online store or a bricks-and-mortar store? How often do you go book shopping?

I’ve loved all book stores since I was a child.  Most of the books I bought when I was growing up came from the book and magazine area of local stores.  Unless it’s a book I really want to own, I generally try to find something at my local library (I’m all for free!). 

Today I generally go to Borders or Barnes & Noble to purchase books.  I love wandering through our Half Price Bookstore as well looking for new releases for half price.  One of the malls also has a Books-A-Million but I only go there when I have to be at that mall.  Up the road a few blocks in one of the strip shopping centers is a discount book store.  It is privately owned and very small.  Over the 20+ years I’ve lived in the area, the book store has changed hands many times.  One owner had cats that would be curled up at various locations in the store.  They even used to host book signings by local authors.

When Barnes & Noble came to our area, I was fascinated with the concept of a book store having chairs and sofas available for people who just wanted to read.  Excuse me?  I used to get chased out of stores because I was reading the merchandise instead of buying it.  What a great concept!  Instead of deciding on a book because of the back cover, I could read a few pages to see if it was going to hold my interest.  Not only that but there was a coffee shop (most have Starbucks) as part of the atmosphere as well. 

When my husband and I were first married, we spent three hours at a bookstore in Dallas.  It was huge and also had a large “technical book” area which my husband loved.  The store was in a shopping center close to what used to be Prestonwood Mall (now both the mall and the bookstore are out of business). 

For our family going to the book store is a family affair.  Everyone wants a new book.  Unfortunately, I don’t have a separate “library” room so we are always being over run by all the books we buy (another reason we hit the library more often!).  We tend to go book shopping at least once a month, but if I’m out and about and have to be somewhere close to one of the stores I enjoy, I will stop in and browse.

I’ve ordered books from Amazon because they generally aren’t in any of the book stores close to me, but I’d rather ask my local store to order it if they can (to save on shipping).

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Today I have actually tried to do more research than work on my goals for the Genea-Blogger Group Games.  I did write one post that I scheduled to be posted at another time (part of Write! Write! Write!).  The research I was doing today consisted of gathering information so I could write a thorough biography on one of my ancestors.  I will either be writing about my maternal grandfather, Col. Glen R. Johnson, or my paternal great-grandfather, James Emory House.  Both of them were military veterans.  Grandad (Glen) served from WWI through the Korean War and James was a Civil War infantryman.  Since writing about my grandfather would be much easier because he lived until I was in my 20s and I knew him personally, it may challenge me to write about a man I didn’t know and don’t have much information about except for what my dad and aunt have told me.

So stay tuned to see what decision I’ve made.

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There has been a meme going around the genealogy blogs, started by Lori Thornton of Smoky Mountain Family History about long gone stores of yesteryear.  I’ve read a few of them and it sparked my own memories of the shops we’d go to in downtown Dayton.

Those were the days of department stores where each department was located on a different floor.  I remember the escalator rides.  Most notably as a child we went to Rike’s (photo courtesy of Preservation Dayton) – which no longer exists – and Elder-Beerman.  Sometimes JC Penney’s.

Wright State University Libraries page notes that the seven story building was built in 1912 on the corner of Main and Second Streets in Dayton, Ohio. In 1982 Rike’s merged with Shilito’s and became Shilito-Rikes. In 1986 the company became Lazarus. The building in Dayton was imploded to make way for the Schuster.

We would start on the ground floor and ride up.  I remember the “white” floor.  Nothing but linens, sheets, and draperies.  Ninety-nine percent of the merchandise was white.  Heavy linens.  Not sure why that image is stuck in my head.

At Christmas we would park in a convenient parking garage and walk the sidewalks of downtown Dayton until we’d get to one of the stores.  Up we’d go until we’d get to Santa’s Wonderland.  Beautiful displays of mechanical boys, girls, elves, and reindeer were set up.  There was a children’s puppet show and then finally, the big man himself – Santa Claus – would appear.  All of the children would line up to tell him what we wanted for Christmas and get the annual Photo with Santa taken! 

Whenever my mother needed a store-bought new dress, I remember the dressing rooms with their very heavy curtains (not doors). I’d sit and wait patiently in the “viewing” room until she’d come out and stand in front of the bank of mirrors to check the fit. Those were the days when the sales ladies would bring clothes into the dressing rooms for you or take them away instead of leaving them on a rack somewhere. They’d also help you dress. Very specialized and personal service.

Then there were the stores closer to where we lived.  Going to Kresge’s 5 and 10 cent store was a weekly occurrence. It was like Woolworth’s. Rows and rows of discount items. I loved to look at all the toys and dolls and wander over to the pet department where they really had fish and birds. I saw a mynah bird in Kresge’s once for $15 (hey it was the late 60s!) and begged my mom to buy it! I was a huge fan of “Bewitched” and loved the mynah bird on that show. Plus it talked! She didn’t get it for me!

Then there was Goldman’s in Kettering. It was a predecessor to stores like K-mart and Wal-Mart. In the early 1970s a young school teacher was murdered and they found her in her car that was parked in Goldman’s parking lot. (There was a book written about it called “The Girl on the Volkswagon Floor” written by William Arthur Clark). We’d go there about once a month to look.

My dad was a huge window shopper. We’d go shopping just because. Mom hated it! If she goes shopping, it’s for a reason.

I’d also find myself with my dad in Hardware stores. This was before the big box home improvement stores. The only things that really fascinated me were the bins of screws, nuts and bolts. They were all so shiny!

After I learned to ride my bike – before the era of “stranger danger” – when kids could ride for miles and had to be home by dark, my friends and I would look for glass bottles to turn in for cash (remember those days?) so we could hit Lawson’s (a convenience type store) for candy. Nickel Hershey bars and yard-long bubble gum!

As a dependent of an Air Force veteran, we also shopped at the BX (Base Exchange) – sometimes called the PX (Post Exchange). I remember getting my penny loafers there almost every year.

It seemed that no matter what type of store we went to, the cash registers were all in the front of the store. So as the way shops did business and became more “modern”, I thought it was very odd finding cash registers within the departments of stores instead of located all together.

As I was compiling this, I had to Google several things to make sure my memory was correct and came across a website called Dayton in the 60s and 70s with many references to stores and sights I remember in the Dayton area from my childhood.

Thanks for a trip down memory lane!

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I didn’t check back in last night to update my progress in the Genea-Blogger Group Games.  I realized I could do an indexing project (Number 5 “Reach Out and Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness; Part E. “Participate in an Indexing Project”).  I went on Find a Grave and added 20 new names with pertinent information and some photos. Names and info I entered: maternal grandparents – Vesta and Glen Johnson; aunt and uncle – Glen and Mary Johnson; aunt – Lois Johnson. They are all in Glenn Haven Memorial Gardens in Clark County, Ohio. My maternal great-grandparents: John and Katie Johnson; their two children – Letis and Mary. They are in East Maplewood Cemetery in Anderson, Indiana. John’s parents – James and Amanda Johnson and several of their children – placed in Little Blue River Cemetery in Rush County, Indiana. Vesta’s family (her mother, step-father, and two brothers) – in Greenwood Cemetery, Leaburg, Oregon. Vesta’s father, step-mother and half-brother (Joe, Anna and Albert Wilt) in Beswick Cemetery, Harrison County, Indiana. Vesta’s brother and his wife – Clarence and Maud Wilt – in Mendon Cemetery, Madison County, Indiana. And my brother in Welcome Cemetery, Cullman, Alabama.

I also added a new genealogy blog to Facebook – Linda Robbins’ HollingsworthRobbinsFamilyTree blog. On Facebook, you can find it Here. Please visit Linda’s blog and let her know how much you enjoyed it! Linda’s also pretty new at Facebook and we want to welcome her!

So that tallies up to finishing 4 tasks under that category = Diamond Medal!

I also wrote a post for the upcoming 54th Edition of Carnival of Genealogy on the Family Language (as part of Write! Write! Write!, Part B).  So that tally under that category is now 2 tasks complete for the Silver Medal!

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The topic for the 54th Edition of Carnival of Genealogy is “Family Language”.  Does your family use words and phrases that no one else knows or understands? Where did they come from? Did you ever try to explain your “family language” to outsiders? Tell a story about your family-coined words, phrases, or nicknames.

 

 

I’ve been struggling with this topic because nothing jumped out at me.  Then I realized I “lived” my family’s language!

 

My mother had the normal “mom-isms” when I was growing up:

  • Were you born in a barn?
  • If everyone jumped off a bridge, would you?
  • You’ll see yourself coming and going (this was in response to asking if I could just have clothes bought from a store instead of hand-sewn)
  • Whose glass is this? (in response to seeing a half-empty glass sitting somewhere – a glass that someone is still using!)
  • My skin’s crawlin’ (describing nerves)
  • I forbid . . . (usually something I wanted to do or someone I wanted to be friends with)
  • I have eyes in the back of my head. (this even worked when I said it to my niece and nephew!)
  • Like a bull in a china shop. (Referring to me because I run into things, am clumsy, break things and knock things over.)
  • Did you comb your hair?  (Always said to me because with naturally curly, baby fine hair my hair is always a mess!  Most of the time I wanted to reply, “No, I can’t comb it because I can’t get a comb through it.”
  • Do you think money grows on trees?  Not a good thing to say to a 6 year old who witnessed my grandparents receiving for their 50th anniversary a “money tree”.
  • Get back from the TV, it’ll ruin your eyesight. (Actually I think it’s hereditary!)
  • Carrots are good for your eyes. (Oh yeah, you don’t like them either!)
  • I hope you have children JUST like you.  (Well, guess what? I did. Happy now?)
  • You’re so hateful!  (Usually when I’d misbehave, talk back or yell at my niece and nephew)
  • There’s kids starving in China (ok, send this stuff to them!)
  • What would (neighbors, relatives, or the normal “everyone”) think? (I really don’t care!)

Then there are the unusual ways she puts things. 

  • That’s a bunch of hooey!  Her definition: that’s a load of crap, a bunch of marlarkey, that’s a lie.  (Dictionary.com lists this as an interjection. 1. used to express disapproval or disbelief; 2. silly or worthless talk, writing, ideas, etc.; nonsense; bunk.
  •  She looks tough.  Warning: this does not mean she’s a police officer, body builder, member of the armed forces or a strong woman.  Definition: Girl or woman who looks street-wise, a young girl trying to look older for the wrong reasons, “loose” or easy.  Usually said when someone is wearing way too much make-up, or heavy duty eye shadow or eye liner, too bleached hair that looks unnatural, clothes that are too short or immodest.   Also describes a regular woman or teen-ager who has a mouth like a sewer, and is spouting off loudly in public.
  • Pretty Soup Red (this is what she called tomato soup when my sister was young because even though she likes tomatoes, she didn’t like tomato soup. We still call it Pretty Soup Red today!)
  • We’re having stuffed “mangoes”!  (Boy, doesn’t that sound appetizing?  In actuality, it was stuffed peppers.  For as long as I can remember, Mom has always called peppers – mangoes.  I didn’t even know what a real mango looked like until I was an adult  And yes, I’ve eated mango – just not stuffed!  I’d prefer green bell peppers!)

Since Mom spent several years in Japan, she’d also use Japanese sayings:

  • Dōmo arigatō – thank you
  • Gomen-nasai – I’m sorry

In my present life (husband, 4 kids, 3 grandsons) most of our expressions stem from an incident that will be remembered forever just by the terms we use.

 

Upon smelling someone grilling, we’ll ask: “Should we call it in?”  This is because a neighbor did just that – call the fire dept. one day when we all smelled barbecue. Turns out – he was right.  Another neighbor left their coffee maker on when they left on vacation and it burned into their attic.

 

“Dive Bombing Birds” – the grackles (big ugly black birds) in North Texas just don’t like me.  During a garage sale I was having over 10 years ago, I was talking to the birds on the roof, when one of them swooped down and dive bombed me!

 

“Suicide Walls” – if you’ve ever driven in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area – then I don’t need to explain this.  But if you haven’t, be forewarned that driving on some of the highways you’ll come across high concrete walls on both sides of the roadway.  No where to move if you have to – therefore, it’s like taking your life in your hands.

 

Tommy-toes: a term we call tomatoes made up by my son.

 

Then there are the “Texas” terms that have crept into this native Buckeye’s slang:

  • I’m fixin’ to . . . (going to do something)
  • Y’all (I don’t really have to explain, do I?)

And of course, we must not forget the way we (mis)pronounce stuff due to our Midwestern speech inflections.

Mom’s: Huh-woi-ya (Hawaii), Figger (figure), pronouncing the double “o” in words like Cooper the same as in look, the last syllable of motorcycle is like icicle, pilla for pillow.

I still have trouble with Wash or Washing or Washington.  I pronounce it like woish or warsh.  I also say cooshun for cushion.  My sister & niece spell the word small: s-m-all!

 

Children’s terms: When I was 3-4 years old, I called a tissue, a “Boo”.  I’m not sure why but perhaps because we’d play “peek-a-boo” with tissues.  My oldest daughter used to put her hand on her hip and say “bop” when she had to potty – this was just as we started training her.  To this day I can still see that image of her saying that, and I laugh out loud.  It was priceless!

 

And that’s not a bunch of hooey either!

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Already been pretty busy this morning.  The tasks I’ve completed this morning include:

Write! Write! Write!
Task A.  Write a summary of what your blog is about and post it on your blog – you may not have done this since you started the blog and it is a great way to have new readers learn more about your site.

The Post Below is my submission for that task.  I also added a New Page to my blog.

Reach Out and Perform Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness
A. Comment on a new (to you) genealogy blog.

I just started reading Rainy Day Genealogy Readings the first day of the competition but today was the first day I posted a comment.

B. Join another Genea-blogger’s blog network on Facebook Blog Networks.

Yesterday (as I posted in Day Two), I joined these  5 Blog Networks: Elyse’s Genealogy Blog, 100 Years in America, Gtownma’s Genealogy, Home Town Edition – Kratochvil & Secor” (I also confirmed the author), and Small Leaved Shamrock.

C. Invite another genealogist to join Facebook.

I sent an email to Jeanna from Roots Reading inviting her to join Facebook. (I’ve also sent invites to about 3 other bloggers on the Genea-Bloggers group to join my blog network.)

On Friday evening I completed a task for Organize Your Research. 
D. Organize at least 20 digital photos into folders, label, add metadata, add descriptions, add tags, etc.

This was probably the easiest as the first photos that popped up on my ACDSee program were from my vacation in July.  They were already in the correct folder, the metadata was added automatically when I uploaded them.  I went through and labeled all of them with date the picture was taken, where it was taken, the people in the photo and how they were related, what ocassion it was, and other “fun” and historical information.  I also included the name of the photographer.

So my tallies so far:
Gold Medal in Reach Out and Peform Genealogical Acts of Kindness
Bronze Medal in Write! Write! Write! (I will be working on B. C. & D. of this event as well and hope to finish with a Diamond Medal.)
Bronze Medal in Organize Your Research (I will be working on B. E. & F. of this event and hope to finish with a Diamond Medal.)

The only category that I have not started working on is Cite Your Sources.  I have saved the information from John Wiley’s “How to Cite Your Sources” and hope to begin doing this soon. I would love to be able to cite 50 sources and achieve Platinum Medal status!

I didn’t list that I would compete in the Back Up Your Data challenge.  However I have a brand new flash drive that is just begging for data to be added to it!  Since I did not list this as a goal I would work on, I’m not sure if I would be “disqualifying” myself by competing in this category.  No matter what – I do need to back up my data a lot more than I do now!

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