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Randy Seaver of, GeneaMusings, offers a bit of fun each Saturday night. Two days ago, he came asked “Who’s number 21 on your ahnentafel list?”

This is a list whereby one’s ancestors are in a particular order.  For example – I am number 1 on my list.  My father is number 2 and mother is number 3.  Paternal grandparents are next at number 4 and 5.  Maternal grandparents would be 6 and 7.  Get the picture?

Number 21 on my list would be my paternal 2nd great-grandmother, Julia Ann Lewis.  Up until last summer, I didn’t have a maiden name for her.  She was just “Julia A.” married to Florus Allen House.  Then I found several death certificates of their children listing her maiden name.

Julia was born the day before Christmas in 1815.  I have no documentation as to her place of birth except it is reported in the 1850-1880 censuses as Ohio.  In the 1880 census she listed her parents’ birthplace as Virginia but I don’t know if that was Virginia as it is known today or the part of Virginia that broke from the state to become West Virginia.

Julia and Florus A. House married probably before 1838.  Their oldest child, a daughter, Emily – age 12, is listed in the 1850 Census as being born in Michigan.  Florus had been living in Michigan prior to Ohio so that is possible.  She doesn’t appear on any other censuses of this household, and I haven’t been able to document her death or her marriage. 

Julia and Florus went on to have a total of 11 children.  One daughter, Teressa, died at 3 years and 3 months.  One son, John, died at age 6 and yet another, George, died at less than one day.  My great-grandfather, James Emory House, was the second son and third child of this couple.  The family lived in Coshocton County, Ohio most of their married life.

Julia died eight years after her husband, on October 6, 1899 in Coshocton and is reportedly buried at Mt. Zion Cemetery in Coshocton County.  Unfortunately, I do not have any pictures of this couple or their children (not even my great-grandfather).  I’m hoping that another descendent and distant cousin may share some photos someday.

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Becky, at Kinexxions, Thomas at Destination: AustinFamily and Donna at What’s Past is Prologue have been compiling the “99+ Genealogy Things Meme”. I won’t repeat all of it here – but I will list those things which I have done.

  1. Uploaded tombstone pictures to Find-A-Grave.
  2. Documented ancestors for four generations (self, parents, grandparents, great-grandparents) .
  3. Joined Facebook.
  4. Joined the Genea-Bloggers Group on Facebook.
  5. Talked to dead ancestors.
  6. Researched outside the state in which I live.
  7. Posted messages on a surname message board.
  8. Googled my name.
  9. Performed a random act of genealogical kindness.
  10. Researched a non-related family, just for the fun of it.
  11. Wrote a letter (or email) to a previously unknown relative.
  12. Contributed to one of the genealogy carnivals.
  13. Responded to messages on a message board or forum.
  14. Participated in a genealogy meme. (DUH!!!!)
  15. Created family history gift items (calendars, cookbooks, etc.).
  16. Performed a record lookup for someone else.
  17. Am convinced that a relative must have arrived here from outer space.
  18. Found a disturbing family secret.
  19. Told others about a disturbing family secret.
  20. Combined genealogy with crafts (family picture quilt, scrapbooking).
  21. Think genealogy is a passion not a hobby.
  22. Taught someone else how to find their roots.
  23. Been overwhelmed by available genealogy technology.
  24. Know a cousin of the 4th degree or higher.
  25. Disproved a family myth through research.
  26. Got a family member to let you copy photos.
  27. Looked at census records on microfilm, not on the computer.
  28. Used microfiche.
  29. Visited a church or place of worship of one of your ancestors.
  30. Traced ancestors back to the 18th Century.
  31. Traced ancestors back to the 17th Century.
  32. Have an ancestor who fought in the Civil War.
  33. Taken a photograph of an ancestor’s tombstone.
  34. Became a member of the Association of Graveyard Rabbits.
  35. Joined a Rootsweb mailing list.
  36. Created a family website.
  37. Was overwhelmed by the amount of family information received from someone.
  38. Have broken through at least one brick wall.
  39. Have an ancestor who was a Patriot in the American Revolutionary War.
  40. Use maps in my genealogy research.
  41. Have an ancestor who was married four times (or more).
  42. Learned of the death of a fairly close relative through research.
  43. Have done the genealogy happy dance.
  44. Reunited someone with precious family photos or artifacts.

Wow – out of a total of 104 items, I’ve done 44!  There are a couple other things I’ve done – not on the list:

  1. Taken photos of a dead ancestor/relative in their casket.
  2. Possess photos of dead relatives.
  3. Sent away and received an ancestor’s Civil War Pension Files.
  4. Helped organize a family caravan to cemeteries to visit ancestors/relatives graves.
  5. Visited a Health Dept. in another state to get death certificates of ancestors.
  6. Found my parents’ wedding announcement in the newspaper.
  7. Possess memorial/funeral books for ancestors.
  8. Possess reunion minute books for family reunions held before my birth.
  9. Research the addresses for living relatives to send letters.
  10. Shared gedcom files with newly found and long lost cousins.

So how about you?  Have you played?

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The 63rd Carnival of Genealogy (New Year’s Resolutions) is posted at Creative Gene. Once again, Jasia outdid herself with this one! And for all of the genea-bloggers whose resolutions were to “host a carnival” or show some kindness to other bloggers – Jasia is looking for hosts for this year to help take some of the work off her back.

I urge you to go visit each of these blogs to read their New Year’s Resolutions and add a comment or two!

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Some of the genea-bloggers are listing a “Year in Review” of their blogs for 2008. Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings discovered this meme at John Newmark’s Transylvanian Dutch blog. The idea is to take the first sentence from the first blog of each month. There will end up being 12 sentences. (Since I didn’t start my blog until April, I’ll only have 8 sentences!) So here we go . . .

  1. April: Welcome to “All My Branches” – my blog on genealogy.
  2. May: If I haven’t mentioned it here before, then I will now.
  3. June: Back in the mid 1960’s during a reunion trip to Coshocton, my parents had discussed finding a house that my dad’s mother had grown up in (or was born in). 
  4. July: Please go to Destination: Austin Family to read the 51st Carnival of Genealogy post.
  5. August: To my faithful readers – just a note that I will be posting new stuff soon!
  6. September: Yes, I’ve felt like I’ve taken a long commercial break!
  7. October: The theme for the 6th edition of Smile for the Camera is “Funny Bone”. 
  8. November: Glen Roy Johnson, Jr. being held by his mom (my grandmother), Vesta Wilt Johnson
  9. December: Miriam Robbins Midkiff, of Ancestories2 and Ancestories issued a new word prompt on her Ancestories2 blog.

So there you have it!

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8 Things About Me

Jessica at Jessica’s Genejournal tagged me for the Eight Things About Me meme. I’m a day late so I will post this today. Jessica’s challenge is:

  1. Each player starts with eight random fact/habits about themselves.
  2. People who are tagged need to write their own blog about their eight things and post these rules.
  3. A the end of your blog post, you need to choose eight people to get tagged and list their name.
  4. Don’t forget to leave them a comment telling them they’re tagged and to read your blog.

Here’s mine!

  1. I went through only one school district from K through 12th grade.
  2. I lived in the same house from the time I was born until I was 15.
  3. My brother was already married when I was born and my sister was a sophomore in High School.
  4. I have never been to New England but would love to see Boston and Connecticut.
  5. I’ve been writing poetry, songs, and fiction since I was 10.
  6. I became a graphic artist by chance – without any formal education.
  7. All four of my children grew up in the same house and graduated from the same high school.
  8. My grandson had the same Kindergarten teacher as his aunt and uncle and has the same 2nd grade teacher as his uncle (many, many years apart!).

I’m supposed to tag eight people but since I came into this a little late, I am going to say – if you haven’t been tagged – consider yourself so!

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Thanksgiving Meme

thanksgiving

My newfound cousin, Julie Cahill Tarr, at GenBlog, began a Thanksgiving meme and tagged me. The challenge is to write a blog post listing 2 things I’m thankful for and tag a person to spread the love.

I am thankful for having the best husband in the world who has been my rock for over 20 years; my parents, my four beautiful kids and three grandkids, my sister, niece, nephews, and extended family who I remain close to in spirit even if miles separate us.

I am thankful for being able to visit my mom for a second time this year.  Since my visits are usually a year apart, being able to see her four months after my last visit – especially at this time of year – was a wonderful blessing.

I am going to tag A. Spence of Spence-Lowry Family History.  Julie’s instructions for this meme are:

  1. Write a blog post telling us about 2 things you are thankful for.
  2. You can post the Thanksgiving Day banner above in your post if you like.
  3. Tag one person to spread the love.  Post a comment on their blog so they know they’ve been tagged.
  4. Send a link to your blog post by 11/25 to Julie at:  genblogjulie@gmail.com.

 Julie will post all submissions on 11/26!  Happy Thanksgiving!

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The topic for the 59th Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is: “Politics and Our Ancestors” in honor of Voting Day.  As I thought about this, I knew that I had several ancestors and collateral family members who had served in politics as well as members who were quite vocal in their political affiliations.

My paternal great-grandfather’s brother, George Washington Amore, was a Democrat and served as an Assessor for Linton Township in Coshocton County for three terms in the 1890’s.  In 1909 he ran for Mayor of Plainfield, Ohio.  George’s son-in-law, John D. Woodward, a respected man of Coshocton County, pledged his allegiance to the Democratic party, but held no public office. (Source information from “History of Coshocton County, Ohio: Its Past and Present, 1740-1881″.  Compiled by N.N. Hill, Jr.; Newark, Ohio; A.A. Graham & Co., Publishers; 1881; Carlon & Hollenbeck, Printers & Binders, Indianapolis, Ind.)

My great-aunt (Louisa Clementine Amore Baker) was married to Benjamin Baker who was a Justice of the Peace in Coshocton, Ohio before 1919. (Source information from his obituary published in “The Coshocton Tribune”, Coshocton, Ohio, Page 8, May 21, 1936)

My maternal grandfather, Glen Roy Johnson, Sr., was elected to the Fairfield (now a part of Fairborn), Greene County, Council in 1936 and was instrumental in getting a sewage plant builtHe was a Democrat in his younger years and in his later life affiliated with the Republican party.  He met Richard Nixon about 1972-1973 when he was in Washington D.C. and toured the White House.  (Source information – personal knowledge)

My first cousin, four times removed, John Goul (son of Christian and Ruth Lawson Goul, grandson of my 4th great-grandfather), first vote was cast for John Charles Fremont – the first candidate of the Republican party – who ran against James Buchanan.  John also voted twice for President Lincoln and although he was sought after to run for office in his locale, he refused to have his name put up for any political office.  John’s father, Christian Goul, was a Whig until the formation of the Republican party and then became a life-long Republican. (Source information from “Beers History of Champaign County, Ohio”)

My grandmother’s brother, John Alfred Wilt, was a Republican. (Source information – Vesta C. Johnson)

My 2nd cousin, 3 times removed, George Lewis House, served on the Deshler, Ohio city council and the school board before 1906.  His political affiliation is unknown. (Source information: Jeromey Ward)

My 9th great-grandfather, Richard Treat (d. 1669), represented the settlement of Wethersfield, Hartford County, Connecticut in the first general court in 1637; was a Colonial grand juror in 1643; elected to the general court in 1644 (and was re-elected many times); and was an Assistant Magistrate of the Colony from 1658-1665. (Source information from “The Hollister Family in America”.  Compiled by Lafayette Wallace Case M.D.; Chicago, Fergus Printing Company; 1886).

My maternal grandmother, Vesta Christena Wilt Johnson, was born prior to the passage of the 20th Amendment.  She voted in almost every election after that.  My parents have both voted Democratic most of their lives. 

When I was in 6th grade and Richard Nixon was running for his second term in office, I pasted Nixon/Agnew stickers on my bedroom door so my mom had to see them each time she walked by.  So when Nixon won over McGovern, I teased her mercilessly.  Needless to say, during the Watergate scandal, she had the last laugh over me.  I have voted both Democratic and Republican since I turned 18 and don’t consider myself affiliated with either party.  I am a proponent of voter rights and urge others to vote in order to have a voice in the future of our great nation.  I thoroughly believe that our forefathers and foremothers fought long and hard – either on the battlefield, in elected offices and as Suffragettes – in order to give us that right.  It should not be something we turn our nose up and deny because apathy solves nothing.  To be part of the solution, I believe – as so many of my ancestors – that we must all be active in the future of our community, our school, our city, our state, and our national government – either by voting or running for office in order to affect the change we look toward.

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