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Posts Tagged ‘Carnival of Genealogy’

This is my submission for the 56th Carnival of Genealogy being hosted by Lori Thornton at Smoky Mountain Family Historian. The topic is 10 essential books in my genealogy library.

Unfortunately I haven’t been able to buy a lot of the books I really should.  Some I’ve checked (& re-checked) out of the local library.  Others I’ve been able to find on Google Books.  So without further ado:

1. The Hollister Family of America.  Compiled by Lafayette Wallace Case M.D.; Chicago, Fergus Printing Company; 1886

2. The Genealogy of the Loveland Family in the United States of America from 1635 to 1892. By J.B. Loveland, Fremont, O., and George Loveland, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; Vol. 1; Freemont, Ohio; I.M. Keeler and Son, printers; 1892.

3. The Risley Family History.  By Edwin H. Risley of Utica, N.Y.; The Grafton Press; Genealogical Publishers; New York; MCMIX; Copyright 1909 by Edwin H. Risley.

4. The Treat Family, A Genealogy of Trott, Tratt and Treat.  By John Harvey Treat, A.M.; Salem, Massachussets; The Salem Press Publishing & Printing Company; The Salem Press; 1893.

5. Genealogy of the Bigelow Family of America.  Gilman Bigelow Howe; Worcester, Mass.; Printed by Charles Hamilton; No. 311 Main Street; 1890.

6. Historical Sketches and Reminisces of Madison County.  John L. Forkner and Byron H. Dyson; Anderson, Ind.; 1897; from the Press of Wilson, Humphreys, & Co., Fourth St., Logansport, Ind.

7. A Genealogical Record of the Descendants of Martin Oberholtzer.  By Rev. A.J. Fretz; Milton, N.J.; Press of the Evergreen News; Milton, N.J.; 1908

8. Marriages of Coshocton County, Ohio, 1811-1930.  Miriam C. Hunter; Compiled from marriage records, Probate Court, Coshocton County, Ohio; Coshocton Public Library, Coshocton, Ohio; 1967.

9. History of Coshocton County, Ohio: Its Past and Present, 1740-1881.  Compiled by N.N. Hill, Jr.; Newark, Ohio; A.A. Graham & Co., Publishers; 1881; Carlon & Hollenbeck, Printers & Binders, Indianapolis, Ind.

10. Historical Collections of Coshocton County Ohio; 1764-1876.  By William E. Hunt; Cincinnati; Robert Clarke & Co., Printers, 1876

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Jasia, at Creative Gene received a notice from the folks at Blog Carnival that the Carnival of Genealogy will be the featured Carnival on their site today! Go check out Jasia’s post about it here and also check out the CoG! Congrats to Jasia – who hosts most of these Carnivals and to all of those who contributed to the CoG to make it so successful!

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The Carnival of Genealogy 55th Edition is “Show and Tell”.  “Remember that fun little exercise you used to do in your grade school days? Here’s your chance to do it again. Show us and tell us about an heirloom, a special photo, a valuable document, or a significant person that is a very special part of your family history. Don’t be shy now, show us what you’ve got! This is all about bragging rights so don’t hesitate to make the rest of us green with envy! This is your chance to brag, brag, brag, without seeming like a braggart (you can’t be a braggart when you’re merely following directions ;-)… so show and tell!”  This edition of the Carnival is hosted by Jasia at Creative Gene.

Do to the time constraints I have right now – I will be re-running one of my older posts on “The Christening Gown”.

The Christening Gown (originally published on May 28, 2008)

One of the items that I treasure is the Christening Gown my great-grandmother Katie J. (Blazer) Johnson hand made.  I first saw this gown when I was in high school and needed something that had been passed down through the family for an oral report.  Mom dug it out of the storage trunk and handed me the box.  Inside was this off-white gown and some pictures.  In the old photos were babies wearing this gown: my grandfather – Glen R. Johnson; his son – Glen R. Johnson, Jr.; my aunt – Genevieve; and my mother.  I’m not really sure they were all actually baptized or “christened” in this gown as I have other documents and oral histories about each one being baptized as an older child.

The gown is actually in 2 parts.  The slip which is plain gets put on the baby first and then the “dress” goes over that.  It has hand tatted lace and exquisite handiwork.  There are been some rust stains scattered here and there and Mom actually soaked the dress is carbonated water to remove most of them (old laundry hint!).

The dress remained at my mother’s and when it was time for my nephew’s first child to be baptized, the gown came out of storage and used.  When my first born grandson was to be baptized at six weeks, my mother shipped the box from Ohio to Texas to me.  Then my youngest grandson also wore the gown at 2 months when he was baptized.  The Christening Gown has been worn by 3 out of five generations (I don’t believe any of us – children of my mom, aunt or uncle or our children - have worn the gown).  It truly is a treasure that I will keep for future babies to use.

(Picture is of my youngest grandson wearing the gown at his baptism in October 2006.)

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This morning I received an invitation to join the “Getting to Know You Challenge for Bloggers” in order for those of us in the Genea-Bloggers group to glean more information on each other’s blogs.  There is also the upcoming Carnival of Genealogy 55th Edition – Show and Tell, 5th Edition Smile for the Camera – Crowning Glory, Blog Action Day on October 15th – Poverty, the on-going Genea-Blogger Group Games on Facebook, and my own Freaky Friday challenge.  The meme’s “Stores of Yesteryear” and “The Soundtracks of my Salad Days” have already been written.

And I’m partially done with writing a biography on one of my ancestors for the Group Games.  Looks like some great challenges coming up which give me a chance to flex my writing muscles (as opposed to those leg or arm muscles being used by the athletes at the Olympics!) in order to publish some wonderful posts.

Yesterday I noticed that footnoteMaven wrote an article on Using Family Photographs on Shades of the Departed on how to create a MOO greeting card. This looks like something (as a digital scrapbook artist) I would like to do – which means one more thing to add to my list!

I want to thank the hosts for these carnivals, meme’s, and challenges.  If you have not joined the Genea-Blogger group on Facebook, I urge you to do so.  You aren’t required to participate in any or all of the challenges however the topics do provide inspiration.  If you have tons of documents and photographs that need to be scanned – you are also encouraged to participate in Scanfest happening this coming Saturday.  I won’t be participating as I hope to be car shopping (and buying) on Saturday.

If you have Central European or Irish Ancestry, there are also the 10th Edition of Carnival of Central and European Genealogy hosted by Jessica at Jessica’s GeneaJournal and Carnival of Irish Heritage & Culture hosted by Small Leaved Shamrock.

I urge you to give any one of these challenges a look and serious thought to participating!

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Make sure to head over to Carnival of Genealogy, 54th Edition hosted by Donna Pointkouski at What’s Past is Prologue. The theme is “The Family Language” and there are 30 submissions by 29 authors. We want to thank Donna for hosting this Carnival!
Make sure you visit all of these posts and leave a comment!
The 55th Edition will be on “Show and Tell” and will be hosted by Jasia at Creative Gene. Submissions are due by September 1st.

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The topic for the 54th Edition of Carnival of Genealogy is “Family Language”.  Does your family use words and phrases that no one else knows or understands? Where did they come from? Did you ever try to explain your “family language” to outsiders? Tell a story about your family-coined words, phrases, or nicknames.

 

 

I’ve been struggling with this topic because nothing jumped out at me.  Then I realized I “lived” my family’s language!

 

My mother had the normal “mom-isms” when I was growing up:

  • Were you born in a barn?
  • If everyone jumped off a bridge, would you?
  • You’ll see yourself coming and going (this was in response to asking if I could just have clothes bought from a store instead of hand-sewn)
  • Whose glass is this? (in response to seeing a half-empty glass sitting somewhere – a glass that someone is still using!)
  • My skin’s crawlin’ (describing nerves)
  • I forbid . . . (usually something I wanted to do or someone I wanted to be friends with)
  • I have eyes in the back of my head. (this even worked when I said it to my niece and nephew!)
  • Like a bull in a china shop. (Referring to me because I run into things, am clumsy, break things and knock things over.)
  • Did you comb your hair?  (Always said to me because with naturally curly, baby fine hair my hair is always a mess!  Most of the time I wanted to reply, “No, I can’t comb it because I can’t get a comb through it.”
  • Do you think money grows on trees?  Not a good thing to say to a 6 year old who witnessed my grandparents receiving for their 50th anniversary a “money tree”.
  • Get back from the TV, it’ll ruin your eyesight. (Actually I think it’s hereditary!)
  • Carrots are good for your eyes. (Oh yeah, you don’t like them either!)
  • I hope you have children JUST like you.  (Well, guess what? I did. Happy now?)
  • You’re so hateful!  (Usually when I’d misbehave, talk back or yell at my niece and nephew)
  • There’s kids starving in China (ok, send this stuff to them!)
  • What would (neighbors, relatives, or the normal “everyone”) think? (I really don’t care!)

Then there are the unusual ways she puts things. 

  • That’s a bunch of hooey!  Her definition: that’s a load of crap, a bunch of marlarkey, that’s a lie.  (Dictionary.com lists this as an interjection. 1. used to express disapproval or disbelief; 2. silly or worthless talk, writing, ideas, etc.; nonsense; bunk.
  •  She looks tough.  Warning: this does not mean she’s a police officer, body builder, member of the armed forces or a strong woman.  Definition: Girl or woman who looks street-wise, a young girl trying to look older for the wrong reasons, “loose” or easy.  Usually said when someone is wearing way too much make-up, or heavy duty eye shadow or eye liner, too bleached hair that looks unnatural, clothes that are too short or immodest.   Also describes a regular woman or teen-ager who has a mouth like a sewer, and is spouting off loudly in public.
  • Pretty Soup Red (this is what she called tomato soup when my sister was young because even though she likes tomatoes, she didn’t like tomato soup. We still call it Pretty Soup Red today!)
  • We’re having stuffed “mangoes”!  (Boy, doesn’t that sound appetizing?  In actuality, it was stuffed peppers.  For as long as I can remember, Mom has always called peppers – mangoes.  I didn’t even know what a real mango looked like until I was an adult  And yes, I’ve eated mango – just not stuffed!  I’d prefer green bell peppers!)

Since Mom spent several years in Japan, she’d also use Japanese sayings:

  • Dōmo arigatō – thank you
  • Gomen-nasai – I’m sorry

In my present life (husband, 4 kids, 3 grandsons) most of our expressions stem from an incident that will be remembered forever just by the terms we use.

 

Upon smelling someone grilling, we’ll ask: “Should we call it in?”  This is because a neighbor did just that – call the fire dept. one day when we all smelled barbecue. Turns out – he was right.  Another neighbor left their coffee maker on when they left on vacation and it burned into their attic.

 

“Dive Bombing Birds” – the grackles (big ugly black birds) in North Texas just don’t like me.  During a garage sale I was having over 10 years ago, I was talking to the birds on the roof, when one of them swooped down and dive bombed me!

 

“Suicide Walls” – if you’ve ever driven in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area – then I don’t need to explain this.  But if you haven’t, be forewarned that driving on some of the highways you’ll come across high concrete walls on both sides of the roadway.  No where to move if you have to – therefore, it’s like taking your life in your hands.

 

Tommy-toes: a term we call tomatoes made up by my son.

 

Then there are the “Texas” terms that have crept into this native Buckeye’s slang:

  • I’m fixin’ to . . . (going to do something)
  • Y’all (I don’t really have to explain, do I?)

And of course, we must not forget the way we (mis)pronounce stuff due to our Midwestern speech inflections.

Mom’s: Huh-woi-ya (Hawaii), Figger (figure), pronouncing the double “o” in words like Cooper the same as in look, the last syllable of motorcycle is like icicle, pilla for pillow.

I still have trouble with Wash or Washing or Washington.  I pronounce it like woish or warsh.  I also say cooshun for cushion.  My sister & niece spell the word small: s-m-all!

 

Children’s terms: When I was 3-4 years old, I called a tissue, a “Boo”.  I’m not sure why but perhaps because we’d play “peek-a-boo” with tissues.  My oldest daughter used to put her hand on her hip and say “bop” when she had to potty – this was just as we started training her.  To this day I can still see that image of her saying that, and I laugh out loud.  It was priceless!

 

And that’s not a bunch of hooey either!

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The theme for this Carnival is Carousel.  All genealogy related topics were allowed.  Please head over to Jasia’s Creative Gene Blog for the list. This time there are 39 Submissions! That is amazing and wonderful! Please read each submission and leave a comment so the submitter knows you have read their post and if it inspired you in any way – or just thank them for posting.
I’ve tried to read each submission for the last several posts except the 52nd Edition that posted when I was on vacation. I’m just not that caught up yet! I plan on spending a good chunk of time reading the current Edition!
Thanks, Jasia, for hosting this Carnival! The 54th Edition will be hosted by Donna Pointkouski at What’s Past is Prologue and will be on the topic of The Family Language. Submission deadline will be August 15th so put on your thinking caps and start writing!

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Rummaging through the old photographs at my mom’s house in 2000, I came across one with the name “Chase Noonan and Friends” on the back.  Who is or was he, I wondered. My mom told me he was Aunt Mat’s son.

Martha Blazer, also known as “Aunt Mat”, was the oldest daughter and second child of Franklin Blazer and Malissa Goul.  She was the sister of my great-grandmother, Katie J. Blazer and my elusive great-great-aunt Rachel Blazer Given.

My mother remembers a woman who she called “dirty” – probably because she chewed tobacco.  She said when Aunt Mat would visit they had to get her a “spit” bucket.  My mom thought Aunt Mat had another son besides Chase but I’ve yet to find one.

I came across Martha Hardman in the 1900 Census living in Anderson, Madison County, Indiana on what looks like Central.  She was 39 years old and widowed.  She listed that she had one child who was still alive.  Also in the household was Thomas C. Noonan (born July 1887), age 12.

The Madison County Marriage Index lists that Martha Blazier (sic) married John Noonan on July 4, 1887.  Martha married Peter Hardman on March 19, 1893.  That was about all the information I found for Martha besides her obituary stating that she died on March 10, 1948 in Anderson, Indiana.  It listed her age as 87 and that she was survived by one son, Chase Noonan, of Anderson.

For several years that was all the information I had about Martha and her son.  I did know that Chase had married and had a daughter, Ruth, as I’d come across pictures of “Mrs. Chase Noonan and daughter, Ruth”.  No matter where I looked, I couldn’t seem to find any further mention of Chase, his wife, or Ruth.  That is until I ran across a 1930 Census taken in Bexar County, Texas.  It showed Ruth was living at Ursuline Academy in San Antonio, age 15.  I then looked further into that Census and found Chase, aged 40, widowed, living as a boarder in an unrelated household.

What happened to Chase’s wife?  More importantly what was her name?  And how did the family get from Indiana to San Antonio?

Thanks to my local library, I can access the Census records from Heritage Quest, and found Chase (listed as Charles T.) – age 30, his wife, Agnes – age 28, daughter, Ruth Martha – age 3, and son, William E. (looks like 14 but I believe it’s 4) born in Ohio, in San Antonio in the 1920 Census.  Chase’s occupation was a machinist.  I finally had a name for his wife plus I located a son!

When Familysearch digitized Texas death records, I learned that Agnes Hughes Noonan was born on Oct. 2, 1891 in Mayo, Northern Ireland.  That corresponds to the 1930 Census for Ruth where she lists her mother being born in Northern Ireland.  She was the daughter of John Hughes and Mary (no maiden name listed).  Agnes died on Feb. 23, 1923 at her home at 221 E. Georgia Ave., San Antonio, Texas of what appears to be chronic myocarditia.  On the death certificate Chase is listed as “Chase T. Noonan”.  Agnes was buried at Mission Burial Park in San Antonio.

Then I found William Emmett Noonan at Kelly Field, San Antonio in the 1930 Census.  He lists his birthplace as Ohio (which I found out later is probably correct as it has been claimed that Chase and family lived in northern Ohio for a short time).  William’s age was 26, he was in the Special Services, a soldier in the U.S. Army, and it looks like it reads 44th School Squadron.   I believe I also located a death record for William that shows he passed away on March 15, 1956 in Bexar County, Texas.  Unfortunately, I can’t get into the death record to find out if this is the correct person.

Through some newspaper clippings, I located Ruth’s graduation from Ursuline Convent when she took her vows to become a nun.  She took the name Sister Mary Rebecca in June 1939.  She was teaching at St. Patrick’s Parochial School in Galveston.

When Ancestry had free access to military records a couple months ago, I found a WWII Registration card dated April 27, 1942 for Chase that lists his full name as Chase Thomas Noonan, born July 9, 1888 in Anderson, Indiana.  He was living at the Stillwell Hotel in Anderson, Indiana and his telephone exchange was 5596.  He was also employed by the Stillwell Hotel.  Chase listed that his daughter would always know his address and he listed her as Sister Mary Rebecca, living at the Ursuline Convent in Galveston, Texas.  He stood 5’ 5½” tall and weighed 150 lbs.  Chase had light complexion, brown eyes and black hair. 

When I contacted the Indiana Room at the Anderson Public Library, I was pleasantly surprised to receive via email several news clippings concerning Chase, his father, John Noonan and Aunt Mat.  They detailed that John had been ill and hospitalized and then his subsequent death on Oct. 16, 1921 at St. John’s hospital.  It was also thought that he had never married and had no known heirs (other than his late sister’s widower) to his estate that was estimated over $60,000.  Aunt Mat apparently read that news article and went straight to work.  She put out a search for her son, whom she had not seen since one visit in 1910 after he’d left Anderson.  She revealed to the Anderson newspaper that she and John (Jack) Noonan had married in 1885 and divorced less than two years – although Aunt Mat said Chase was born in 1886 less than a year into her marriage.  She said that her son had been employed by an auto company in Cleveland in 1910.  Jack and Chase had seen each other from time to time and remained on friendly terms throughout his childhood but Mat had not seen or spoken to her ex-husband after Chase left Anderson in 1907.  Mat also appealed to the War Dept. hoping they had a record for her son.  In the same news article, she revealed that she had been married not twice, but three times.  Her second husband, Peter Hardman, she married in 1891 and he died in 1900.  During a trip to the East in 1905 she met and married a man named Matoon.  She left him very soon after that and returned to using her second husband’s name.

An article also emailed to me dated Dec. 5, 1922 claims that Chase had been located and would receive $2,500 from his father’s estate.  The rest had been gifted to friends and in-laws shortly before John Noonan’s death.  When he returned to Anderson, he brought his eight year old daughter, Ruth, with him.

Another newspaper article suggests that Chase had married for a second time to a woman named Pauline Elese (maiden name unknown) as a Divorce Proceeding Listing was located in the San Antonio Light, March 8, 1932 edition.

In that email there was also a death notice for Chase (whom I was unable to locate in the Texas death records).  He had returned to live and work in Anderson (as listed on the April 1942 military registration) and was employed by the Delco Remy plant as an inspector.  He died on Feb. 2, 1949 from a skull fracture after an accidental fall.  His daughter, listed as Miss Ruth Rosaleen Noonan from Chicago, was reported as his survivor.  He was taken back to San Antonio and buried in the family plot at Mission Burial Park.

I think I’ve documented many facts in my research into Aunt Mat and Chase Noonan.  I haven’t been able to locate any further information on either Ruth or William.  It looks unlikely that they had any children which leaves me with a cold trail up to the present and several unanswered questions.

I’ve also discovered that not everything can be found at one time.  It might take several years, the kindness of strangers, and pieces of information that had seemed unlikely at first in order to piece together enough of the puzzle to be able to tell what the full picture probably is.  I believe I’m done chasing Chase.

(Photos from Top – Chase Noonan (L) & Friends; Aunt Mat (Martha Blazer) and son, Chase Noonan; Mrs. Chase Noonan and daughter, Ruth; Agnes Hughes Noonan’s Death Certificate; WWII Registration for Chase Noonan.)

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The theme for the 52nd Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is AGEAs family historians, we take time to carefully mark the birthdates of our forebearers. We print out family tree charts including this all-important data. We make it a point to note at what age family members have married, had children and passed away.  Take some time to look over the data that you have collected on members of your family tree, and share a story of age with us for the upcoming edition of the carnival. Do you have a member of the family who went to work to support the family while still of a tender age? Someone who accomplished something that was typically done by others beyond his or her years? A couple who married young? A couple with disparate ages? A family member who accomplished something of note at an advanced age? How about family members that lived many years, outlasting many of their relatives and friends? With the understanding that “age is often a state of mind”, share your family story about someone whose story stands out because of their age, either young or old.

I found myself thinking “what am I going to post about?”  How about some statistics concerning age within my family tree?

Marriages:

  • My parents were married when they were both 22.
  • Glen Johnson and Vesta Wilt (maternal grandparents): 18 [1916]
  • Lloyd Amore and Ella House (paternal grandparents): 21 & 20 [1903]
  • John L. Johnson and Katie J. Blazer (maternal g-grandparents): 22 & 18 [1883]
  • Joseph Wilt and Martha Stern (maternal g-grandparents): 22 & 18 [1890]
  • Henry Amore and Annie Werts (paternal g-grandparents): 20 & 17 [1872]
  • James House and Frances Ogan (paternal g-grandparents): 24 & 26 [1873]
  • James W. Johnson and Amanda Mullis (maternal g-g-grandparents): 24 & 19 [1852]
  • Frank Blazer and Malissa Goul (mat. g-g-grandparents): abt. 22 & abt. 26 [abt. 1858]
  • Isreal Wilt and Christena Nash (mat. g-g-grandparents): 29 & 20 [1857]
  • Emmanuel Stern and Nancy Caylor (mat. g-g-grandparents): 22 & 16 [1857]
  • William Amore and Charlotte Imons (pat. g-g-grandparents): 20 & 22 [1851]
  • William Werts and Louisa Bookless (pat. g-g-grandparents): 22 & 18 [1852]
  • Florus House and Julia Lewis (pat. g-g-grandparents): 25 & 23 [abt. 1838]

I didn’t go as far back as I could, but I thought that information would give a sampling.  A few things I noticed: most of the time they were married at or before age 20 or in their early 20s.  Only in two cases are the wives older than their husbands by at least a year or more.  There isn’t too many years difference between a husband and wife.  Even though the time spans over 100 years, there isn’t many changes in how old/young the couple was upon marriage.

AVERAGE AGE AT DEATH

  • Grandparents: 76 3/4 years old
  • Great-grandparents: 77.5 years old
  • Great-Great-Grandparents: 57 years old

There is a span of average age at death of almost 20 years between my g-g-grandparents’ generation and my g-grandparents’ generation.  There were several who died at a young age: Charlotte Imons died at the age of 34; William Washington Werts died at 27; Christena Nash died at 39; Franklin Blazer died at 33; Amanda Mullis died at 35. 

Then I looked at my dad’s line and discovered another interesting fact.  My Grandpa Amore’s brothers lived long lives.  Isaiah (Zade) Amore: 100;

Roy Amore: 95; Rollo Amore: 87; Herbert Amore: 93; Clarence Amore: 80.  His sister, Clemmie Amore, died at the age of 82.  Only my grandfather, Lloyd, died before the age of 80, when he was 72.  My dad’s siblings also have lived long lives: Gertrude: 98; Paul: 91; Norman: 86; Bervil: 81.  My aunt is still living and she is 99.  Only my Uncle Gail died in his 70s from cancer. 

What that tells me is that especially on my paternal side – longevity is more than likely in the genes as opposed to the environment.  For the Amore’s grew up close to coal mines and many of them lived a pretty hard life. 

All in all – age is only what we make of it.  Whether we marry young or in our maturity; have our first child young or as an older, more patient parent.  If we live very long lives, are we making the most out of our time or just passing through?

(Photos: Top – Henry and Annie Amore; Center Right: Emmanuel and Nancy Stern)

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Please go to Destination: Austin Family to read the 51st Carnival of Genealogy post. This Carnival was hosted by Thomas MacEntee. Thanks, Thomas! The Carnival was a tribute to Independence Day with the topic: “Independent Spirit. There are so many great posts about men and women who took a different path than others. They set out on their own and did things their way even when others said “it won’t work” or “are you crazy?

I urge everyone to read all the entries and please leave a comment on those you visit!  As a recent contributor to the Carnivals, it really helps to know what people are thinking when they read the posts and lets me put a (blog) face with a name!  Remember if you leave a comment on my blog, I will include you (if I haven’t already) in my Genealogy Links or Genealogy Blogs link in the hopes that you might get more visitors coming to your site. 

Once again, thank you for visiting and I hope you enjoy my contribution to the 51st CoG – Independent From Birth about my great-aunt, Eva Johnson.

Happy Fourth of July!

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