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In Extracting Data from a Biographical Sketch, I went through the steps I took in order to make the article found within a book easier to understand. In this post, I will focus on the data within the main paragraph of what I re-wrote complete with the sources of documentation.

 

Below is the paragraph to be analyzed:

JOHN GOUL was born in Union Township, Champaign County, Ohio in 1832 the second child of Christian Goul and Ruth Lawson. At the age of two or three, he moved with his parents to Mechanicsburg. He has lived in this township most of the time since then. Mr. Goul was reared as a farmer and remained at his parents’ home assisting with the duties of the farm until adulthood. In 1854 he married Susan F. Coffenbarger. During the Civil War, he was a soldier serving with the 134th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, most of the time on picket duty at the siege of Petersburg, Virginia. His pursuits include farming and stock-dealing and is a Republican. J. Goul is a member of the I.O.O.F. and for the last twenty years, a member of the M.E. Church. He has two farms under the best modern improvements. The farm that he lives on is of 150 acres and the other farm, located in Union Township, is 84 acres in size. John Goul’s wife, Susan, is a native of Maryland but has been a resident of Champaign County since she was nine years old. The couple had two sons and three daughters but two of the daughters have died.

 

In the first sentence, several pieces of information are given – name, birth place, birth year, and parents’ names. His name (John Goul) is documented in several records. There is a John Gowl (surname misspelled – but spelled phonetically) found living in the home of Christian and Ruth Gowl in Goshen Township, Champaign County, Ohio in the 1850 census. (1) On the State of Ohio death certificate John Goul’s father is listed as Christian Goul and his mother is listed as Ruth Lawson with Mrs. John Goul as the informant. John Goul’s birthdate reads February 6, 1832 with a birth place of Champaign County, Ohio. (2) The photograph of the headstone for John Goul on Find a Grave shows his date of birth as February 6, 1832. (3)

 

The second sentence tells the reader John Goul’s age when he moved with his parents from one township in Champaign County to another (Mechanicsburg). There isn’t any documentation for this; however, the following sentence indicating he lived primarily in Mechanicsburg for the rest of his life can be seen via the 1860/1870/1880/1900 censuses. (4,5,6,7)

 

No proof exists that John Goul remained at his parents home until he was an adult – or as the original biographical sketch says “until maturity” other than he was still living in his parents’ home in 1850 at the age of eighteen as indicated by the 1850 census.(1)

 

The next part concerns the date of marriage of John Goul and Susan Coffenbarger. In the Champaign County (Ohio) Marriage Records, Vol. E there is an entry that shows the couple was married in the Probate Court on September 26, 1834 by William C. Keller, JP. (8)

 

John Goul’s military service in the Civil War is documented in the United States Census of Union Veterans and Widows of the Civil War, 1890 showing that he served in the 134th Regiment Co. E of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry (National Guard). The census lists his length of service as 3 months and 25 days in the summer of 1864. (9) Even though Goul was not in the military very long, he did serve the entire time that the Regiment was active as Wikipedia states that it was “mustered in May 5, 1864 for 100 days service under the command of Colonel James B. Armstrong” and “mustered out of service at Camp Chase on August 31, 1864.” Furthermore, this reference notes that besides building roads early in the summer, the Regiment had “picket duty” in parts of Virginia which documents what was listed in the biography. (10) In the digital book found on Google, History of Champaign County, Ohio: Its People, Industries and Institutions, Volume 1 page 746, there is a reference to the action which reads, “The detail of one hundred and fifty men under Lieutenant-Colonel Todd moved back to camp on the night of June 14th. On that day General Grant had ordered General Butler to move against the rebels in front of Petersburg, and on June 15th and 16th, the One Hundred and Thirty Fourth Regiment was placed on picket duty along the breastworks.” (11) This lends credence to what Goul’s biography claims.

 

The next section lists John Goul’s interests and associations. The only documentation concerning his interest in farming is through the 1860/1870/1880 (4,5,6) censuses and his death certificate (2) which indicate his occupation was “farmer.”

 

The digitized book History of Champaign County, Ohio: Its People, Industries and Institutions, Volume 1 on page 644 mentions that the Wildly Lodge No. 271 of the I.O.O.F. in Mechanicsburg began in 1855 and also had stockholders. (12) So it is quite possible that John Goul was a member of the International Order of Odd Fellows as well as dabbled in stock-dealing although documentation to support that claim has not been located.

 

John Goul’s voting record as a Republican can only be found within this biography. He did not run for public office at any time so his political affiliation is not documented.

 

That Goul was a farmer is known via the aforementioned censuses however it is unknown what – if any – modern improvements had been made. In 1874, a land survey map shows that John had 40 acres in Union Township. His father, Christian, owned 272 acres. In order to find out if Christian willed land to John after his death in September 1879, Christian’s will needs to be examined. The will states that John gets 40 of those acres making a total of 80 acres in Union Township, 4 acres less than what the biography states. (13,14) There isn’t any records found that details what type of modern conveniences or equipment John Goul employed on his land. Interestingly enough, on the 1860 Census, Goul lists his real estate value as $1500 and his personal estate value as $400. Today, those amounts would translate to almost $43,000 and $11,500. (15) By the 1870 Census those amounts had jumped to $6000 and $850 respectively – and this is prior to being willed land by his father, Christian. The 1880 and 1900 censuses did not require this information to be listed. Based on the real estate values given, John Goul was doing pretty well. (4,5)

 

The final section of the paragraph concerns John Goul’s wife, Susan, and their children. Mrs. Goul’s birth place is noted as Maryland and was listed in the 1880 and1900 censuses (16,17) as well as her death certificate (18)  that her son, Walter was the informant. In the 1840 census there is a female age 5 and under living in the Jacob Cofferberger household in Frederick, Dorchester county, Maryland (presumably this would be Susan but can not be verified). (19) On the 1850 census, she is found living with her widowed mother, Elizabeth, in Union twp, age 13 and her birth place is listed as Virginia; (20) just as it is in the 1860 and 1870 census. (21,22) However, on the 1910 census Susan is living with her son, Walter (the informant on her death certificate) and her place of birth is listed as Ohio. (23) Due to the close proximity of Virginia and Maryland, it is quite possible that the family was living in one state when she was born in the other or the confusion could be due to the boundary change over the years. As far as the inaccuracy of the 1910 census, Walter’s wife could have provided the information and not known Susan’s place of birth, the census taker got “Ohio” happy while marking it down, or Susan had been in Ohio for so long that she considered it her place of birth by that time.

 

The biography mentions that John and Susan Goul had five children – two sons and three daughters but that two of the daughters had died. Their children were Martha T. Goul, George Frederick “Fred” Goul, Isabelle Ruth Goul, Parthena Frances Goul, and Walter S. Goul. The only child not listed in any census records is Martha T. Goul as she was born on September 3, 1855 and died a month later on October 9, 1955. Her existence only came to light recently due to a memorial and photo of gravestone on Find a Grave. (24) The other daughter who had died prior to the completion of the book containing the biography was Parthena Frances born on November 7, 1861 and died on October 16, 1870. (25) Her gravestone found on Find a Grave reads “Parthena F. dau of J. & S.F. Goul died Oct. 16, 1870 aged 8 yrs 11 mos 9 ds.” (26) Parthena was only in the 1870 census before she died. (27) George Frederick (“Fred”) is found in his parents’ household in the 1860 census at age 3 years, the 1870 census age 13 years and 1880 census age 23 years. (28,29,30) Isabelle Ruth is found in living with her parents at age one year in the 1860 census, at 11 years in the 1870 census, and age 19 years in the 1880 census. (31,32,33) Isabelle died on August 21, 1881 in Goshen Township. (34,35) Youngest child, Walter, was born on February 18, 1868 in Goshen Township. (36) He is living in his parents’ household on the 1870 census at age 2 and the 1880 census at age 12. (37,38)

 

In conclusion, most of the information in the biographical sketch can be verified. A few items are still in question such as the place of Susan Coffenbarger’s birth and John Goul’s interests and type of equipment on his farm. Taken as a complete whole, the biography is a good source of information but only with the appropriate and correct sources for documentation.

Sources:

 

  1. “United States Census, 1850,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MX3J-YPC : accessed 15 Oct 2014), John Gowl in household of Christian Gowl, Goshen, Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing family 223, NARA microfilm publication M432.
  2. “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X8ZZ-5ZG : accessed 19 Sep 2014), John Goul, 11 Feb 1909; citing Goshen Twp., Champaign, Ohio, reference fn 59187; FHL microfilm 1927275.
  3. Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 19 September 2014), memorial created by Candy; 1 May 2012; memorial page for John Goul (1832-1909), Find A Grave Memorial no. 89393223, citing Maple Grove Cemetery, Mechanicsburg, Champaign County, Ohio; the accompanying photograph by Candy provides a legible image of the transcribed data.
  4. 1860 U.S. census, Champaign, Ohio, Goshen, p. 180, dwelling 1181/family 1181, John Goul; digital image, ProQuest, HeritageQuest Online (access through participating libraries: accessed 19 September 2014); citing National Archives Microfilm M653, roll 942.
  5. 1870 year U.S. census, Champaign, Ohio, Goshen, p. 239, dwelling 280/family 300, John Goul; digital image, ProQuest, HeritageQuest Online (access through participating libraries: accessed 19 September 2014); citing National Archives Microfilm M593, roll 1179.
  6. 1880 year U.S. census, Champaign, Ohio, Goshen, enumeration district (ED) 19, p. 219, dwelling 89/family 95, John Gowl; digital image, ProQuest, HeritageQuest Online (access through participating libraries: accessed 19 September 2014); citing National Archives Microfilm T9, roll 998.
  7. 1900 U.S. census, Champaign, Ohio, Goshen, enumeration district (ED) 3, p. 32, dwelling 139/family 140, John Goul; digital image, ProQuest, HeritageQuest Online (access through participating libraries: accessed 19 September 2014); citing National Archives Microfilm T623, roll 1245.
  8. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1997,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZK7-N7X : accessed 19 Sep 2014), John Goul and Susan F. Coffinbarger, 26 Sep 1854; citing Champaign, Ohio, United States, reference p 319 cn 6029; FHL microfilm 295229.
  9. “United States Census of Union Veterans and Widows of the Civil War, 1890″, index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/K83V-9RQ : accessed 15 Oct 2014), John Goul, 1890.
  10. Wikipedia contributors. “134th Ohio Infantry.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 21 Jul. 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2014.
  11. Evan P. Middleton, History of Champaign County, Ohio: Its People, Industries and Institutions, Volume 1 (1917); p. 176; digital, (http://books.google.com). 14 Oct 2014.
  12. Evan P. Middleton, History of Champaign County, Ohio: Its People, Industries and Institutions, Volume 1 (1917); p. 644; digital, (http://books.google.com). 14 Oct 2014
  13. Atlas of Champaign County 1874, Union Township, published by Starr & Headington, 1874. Digitized by Historic Map Works Genealogy, Item No. US21861. Accessed 17 Sep 2014.
  14. “Ohio, Probate Records, 1789-1996,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-27593-4386-2?cc=1992421&wc=9GML-K6N:266279201,266876501 : accessed 17 Sep 2014), Champaign > Wills 1870-1882 vol D > image 2 of 340.
  15. Dave Manuel, “Inflation Calculator.” DaveManuel.com, 2014. Web. 15 Oct 2014.
  16. “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MZ1N-WHC : accessed 20 Sep 2014), Susan F Gowl in household of John Gowl, Goshen, Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 219A, NARA microfilm publication T9.
  17. “United States Census, 1900,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMC6-1MB : accessed 20 Sep 2014), Susan F Goul in household of John Goal, Goshen Township (excl. Mechanicburg), Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 7A, family 140, NARA microfilm publication T623, FHL microfilm 1241245.
  18. “United States Census, 1900,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MMC6-1MB : accessed 15 Oct 2014), Susan F Goul in household of John Goal, Goshen Township (excl. Mechanicburg), Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 7A, family 140, NARA microfilm publication T623, FHL microfilm 1241245.
  19. “United States Census, 1840,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XHYS-GYS : accessed 15 Oct 2014), Jacob Cofferberger, Frederick, Dorchester, Maryland; citing p. 132, NARA microfilm publication M704, roll 165, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C.; FHL microfilm 0013185.
  20. “United States Census, 1850,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MX3V-3M3 : accessed 20 Sep 2014), Susan F Ceffenburger in household of Elizabeth Ceffenburger, Union, Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing family 60, NARA microfilm publication M432.
  21. “United States Census, 1860,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MCGD-GLK : accessed 20 Sep 2014), Susannah F Goul in household of John Goul, Goshen Township, Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing “1860 U.S. Federal Census – Population,” Fold3.com; p. 171, household ID 1181, NARA microfilm publication M653; FHL microfilm 803942.
  22. “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6KD-MFH : accessed 20 Sep 2014), Susan F Goul in household of John Goul, Ohio, United States; citing p. 34, family 300, NARA microfilm publication M593, FHL microfilm 000552678.
  23. “Ohio, Deaths, 1908-1953,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X8VH-PPY : accessed 20 Sep 2014), Susan Frances Goul, 27 Dec 1917; citing Springfield, Clark, Ohio, reference fn 75612; FHL microfilm 1984223.
  24. Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 19 September 2014), memorial created by Candy; 1 May 2012; memorial page for Martha T Goul (1855-1855), Find A Grave Memorial no. 89394361, citing Maple Grove Cemetery, Mechanicsburg, Champaign County, Ohio; the accompanying photograph by Candy provides a legible image of the transcribed data.
  25. “Ohio, Deaths and Burials, 1854-1997,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F66Z-YPF : accessed 20 Sep 2014), Parthena Frances Goul, 16 Oct 1870; citing Goshen Tp, Champaign, Ohio, reference p 16 #84; FHL microfilm 295234.
  26. Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 19 September 2014), memorial created by Candy; 1 May 2012; memorial page for Parthena F Goul (1861-1870), Find A Grave Memorial no. 89394278, citing Maple Grove Cemetery, Mechanicsburg, Champaign County, Ohio; the accompanying photograph by Candy provides a legible image of the transcribed data.
  27. “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6KD-MF8 : accessed 20 Sep 2014), Parthena F Goul in household of John Goul, Ohio, United States; citing p. 34, family 300, NARA microfilm publication M593, FHL microfilm 000552678.
  28. “United States Census, 1860,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MCGD-GL2 : accessed 20 Sep 2014), George F Goul in household of John Goul, Goshen Township, Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing “1860 U.S. Federal Census – Population,” Fold3.com; p. 171, household ID 1181, NARA microfilm publication M653; FHL microfilm 803942.
  29. “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6KD-MFC : accessed 15 Oct 2014), George F Goul in household of John Goul, Ohio, United States; citing p. 34, family 300, NARA microfilm publication M593, FHL microfilm 000552678.
  30. “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MZ1N-WHZ : accessed 15 Oct 2014), George F Gowl in household of John Gowl, Goshen, Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 219A, NARA microfilm publication T9.
  31. “United States Census, 1860,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MCGD-GLL : accessed 15 Oct 2014), Isabel Goul in household of John Goul, Goshen Township, Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing “1860 U.S. Federal Census – Population,” Fold3.com; p. 171, household ID 1181, NARA microfilm publication M653; FHL microfilm 803942.
  32. “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6KD-MFZ : accessed 20 Sep 2014), Isabelle R Goul in household of John Goul, Ohio, United States; citing p. 34, family 300, NARA microfilm publication M593, FHL microfilm 000552678.
  33. “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MZ1N-WH8 : accessed 15 Oct 2014), Isabel R Gowl in household of John Gowl, Goshen, Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 219A, NARA microfilm publication T9.
  34. “Ohio, Deaths and Burials, 1854-1997,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F66Z-KZC : accessed 22 Aug 2013), Isabelle R Goul, 21 Aug 1881.
  35. Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 19 September 2014), memorial created by Candy; 1 May 2012; memorial page for Isabelle Ruth Goul (1859-1880), Find A Grave Memorial no. 89394102, citing Maple Grove Cemetery, Mechanicsburg, Champaign County, Ohio; the accompanying photograph by Candy provides a legible image of the transcribed data.
  36. “Ohio, Births and Christenings, 1821-1962,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XX47-L52 : accessed 22 Aug 2013), Walter F. Goul, 18 Feb 1868.
  37. “United States Census, 1870,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6KD-MFD : accessed 15 Oct 2014), Walter Goul in household of John Goul, Ohio, United States; citing p. 34, family 300, NARA microfilm publication M593, FHL microfilm 000552678.
  38. “United States Census, 1880,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MZ1N-WHD : accessed 15 Oct 2014), Walter S Gowl in household of John Gowl, Goshen, Champaign, Ohio, United States; citing sheet 219A, NARA microfilm publication T9.

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Alva Lester House buried his wife, Mary Lucy Besser, on February 17, 1920 with their stillborn son and next to their two babies – Arthur and Esther – in South Lawn cemetery, Coshocton County, Ohio.

With his two surviving children, Evelyn and Jarold, recuperating from the flu, and feeling as if life has dealt him a losing hand, Lester had to find a way to move forward especially when a few months later his older brother, James W. (Willie) House, died from bronchial asthma.

 

Marriage Permit of Lester House and Pearl Davidson

A little over four years later, he married Pearl Davidson on June 14, 1924.  She was the daughter of Isaac Newton and Mary Davidson of Keene, Coshocton County.  Born the youngest of four children on April 6, 1893, she had lived in Keene until her marriage.  Immediately she became a second mother to Evelyn, age 10, and Jarold, age 8.

Even though Pearl was 31 years old at the time of the marriage, it is unknown if the couple tried to have children or if she had any pregnancy complications. 

Several months after their wedding, Lester’s father, James Emory House, passed away. He was 82 years old. The year following their wedding, Pearl lost her mother, Mary Davidson, due to diabetes.
 
Several years later, Lester’s son, Jarold, went into the U.S. Army.  He enlisted on July 19, 1940 at Fort Hayes in Columbus, Ohio.  During his duties, he was sent to Trinidad in the British West Indies, stationed at Camp Robinson in Arkansas, and also Italy.  In August 1943 he married Elizabeth Johnson.  When she went to visit him a few months later in Arkansas, she found him “leading an improper life and associating with other women”.  Soon she had filed for divorce.  It took over a year for the divorce to be finalized.  There hadn’t been any children born to this union.
 
In April 1942 Lester was required to register for WWII.  Called the “old man’s draft”, he completed the registration card at age 55.  He listed Pearl House as the person who would always know his address.  He lived in the same house he’d grown up in: 423 N. Eleventh Street, Coshocton, Ohio (the home that was willed to him by his parents).  He was working at the Warner Brothers Theater on N. 6th Street in Coshocton and listed that he had distinguishing characteristics of both his thumb joints.  He was 5’10” and weighed 160 lbs. with blue eyes, brown hair and a ruddy complexion.

In December 1944, Pearl became ill, possibly having a mental breakdown.  Lester took her to the doctor.  Requesting that he take his wife to a hospital in Columbus, Pearl was hysterical.  She threatened to end her life as well as her husband’s.  Thinking that he would try to prevent any suicide attempt, Lester took the firing pin from the shotgun he owned and went to work as a janitor at the Bancroft school building on the morning of April 5, 1945.  Not too long after her husband left for work, Pearl figured out how to work the shotgun and killed herself.  Lester had called the doctor and then went back home where he found his wife’s body.  The coroner listed her official cause of death as multiple lacerations of brain due to discharge of shotgun in head, self-inflicted.

With his son in the service in Italy, Lester and Evelyn had to come to terms that Pearl had ended her own life in the community they had lived in all their lives.  She was buried in Prairie Chapel Cemetery in Coshocton County, Ohio two days later.
 
 
Once again, a devastating tragedy had left Lester looking for a way to pick up the pieces of his life.  He had hardly gotten his breath when his older brother, John, died on October 22, 1945 due to coronary thrombosis.  He had already lost another brother, Florus, in 1941 and a half-sister, Lucina, in 1937.  His oldest sister had died in childbirth in 1907.  There were only a half-brother, half-sister and one sister left. 
A month after John died; Lester celebrated the marriage of his daughter, Evelyn, to Ellis Murray close to Thanksgiving 1945.  The joy soon turned to more grief as Lester’s half-brother, Ed House, died three days after Christmas of a cerebral hemorrhage.  It had been so quick and sudden that it was initially reported that he’d died of a heart attack.  Lester’s family was dwindling and more people he loved were dying.
 
Then came the news in 1946 that his son had been wounded serving with the United States 5th Army in Italy.  He’d received wounds to his right arm, chest and thigh and received a Purple Heart.  In July of that year, Lester’s only remaining sister passed away of breast cancer. 
 
A bright spot came in June 1947 when there was a wedding to celebrate.  Jarold and Margaret Ruth Wohlheter married at the Zion Methodist Church in Adamsville, Muskingum County, Ohio.  Within several years, the couple’s family had grown as their children were born. 
Lester then lost his last surviving sibling, his half-sister, Belle Dora (House) Ruby, on November 12, 1951.  He was the last one left of his father’s children and time was slowly catching up to him.
At some point, something must have changed within Jarold.  Something so unsettling that Lester had even more to be concerned about.  In 1958 his son was arrested on morals charges and sent to the State Mental hospital for a sanity hearing.  Finding him sane, he was released back to Coshocton County to be arraigned.  In March he was sentenced to 1-20 years in prison at the Ohio Penitentiary.  A month later, Margaret filed for divorce.  The judge hearing the case found no evidence of cause and dismissed the divorce.  It is unknown the length of Jarold’s sentence or if a divorce ever occurred.
At the age of 76 years, he responded to a letter from his niece.  In the text of the letter he wrote, “I can’t write much as I have a crippled right hand with arthritis.  I am only one of all the children left. And I will be 77 May 9.”
Lester died in January 1968.  He was survived by his son, Jarold, his daughter, Evelyn, and four grandchildren.  Services were held at Gibson and Bontrager Funeral Home and was buried next to his wife, Pearl, at Prairie Chapel Cemetery in Coshocton County, Ohio.
  

Epilogue: Jarold died in August 1980 and Evelyn died in 1985.  It is my wish that my Great-uncle Lester finally found some measure of happiness in his later years.  He had endured so much tragedy and loss in his lifetime that he deserved some bright spots.

 

 

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James Emory House, born 2 May 1842, was my great-grandfather, born over 100 years and dying 35 years before I was born.  Yet it is this man that I return to in my family tree to seek out more information.  His is a fascinating story, and my father was privileged to be a small child in his company.

 

 

The House family originated in England and migrated to the United States in the 1600s settling in the Glastonbury area of Hartford County, Connecticut.  The family had married into the Loveland, Hollister, Risley, Bidwell, and Bigelow families.  When Allen House (son of Lazarus House and Rebecca Risley) was a very young man, he served in the War of 1812 from July 18 to Sept. 16, 1813. He and Editha Bigelow had been married less than a year.  In 1816 the couple moved from Connecticut to New York and became members of the Methodist Church in Ovid.  They moved then to Seneca County, New York. (1)  They are found in the 1820 census for Ontario and Steuben counties living in the town of Jerusalem. (2)

 

By 1835 the family migrated to Michigan via Buffalo, New York (via Canal) then to Detroit (via steamboat) and settled in Oakland County.  He received a government land patent for Section 7, Milford Twp. Oakland Co., MI.  He had 91 acres and not much money left over.  (3) (4)

 

Allen (b. 13 Jun 1791 d. 1 Sep 1845) and Editha (b. 19 Apr 1791 d. 20 Oct 1865) had five children – Nelson W. House b. 13 Jan 1815 in Glastonbury, CT; Amasa G. House b. 26 Sep 1817 in Yates, NY; Florus Allen House b. 05 Jan 1813 in NY; Eli H. House b. 16 Feb 1824; and Abigail House b. East Hampton, Middlesex County, Connecticut.  The couple is buried in Oakgrove Cemetery, Milford, Michigan.

 

Florus Allen House married Julia Ann Lewis (b. 24 Dec 1815) before 1838.  Florus received government land in Livingston County, Michigan.  He first acquired 80 acres in 1835 and then120 acres in 1837.  The family is found in the 1850 Census taken on October 23, 1850.  They lived in Linton Twp, Coshocton County, Ohio.  Florus was 37, Julia (listed as Julianna) – age 34.  Their children were Emily (12), Wm R. (10), James E (8), Margaret (4), Sarah E. (3).  Emily is listed as being born in Michigan and the rest in Ohio. (5)

 

The family is also found in the same township in the 1860 census.  By the 1870 census they were living in Tuscarawas Twp in Coshocton County where they were still living in the 1880 census. In addition to the children listed above, the family also included Emma, Nancy and John. (6) 

                                             

 

The nation was being torn apart – the north and south ripped asunder as the War Between the States dawned.  On the day following Christmas in 1861, James House, age 19, enlisted in Company “H” of the 80th regiment of the Ohio Volunteers commanded by Col. Ephraim Eckley.  Two months later the regiment left Ohio and began its trek toward battle in Corinth, Mississippi.  It was near Corinth in April 1862 that James became seriously ill with catarrh of the stomach.  This was a particularly debilitating illness with symptoms of moroseness, weakness, chills, and paleness.  One’s stomach would feel full and sore to the touch, the appetite would be non-existent, yet thirst is great.  In addition to that, there would be bloating and constipation.  James suffered with this illness for the rest of his life.  During war time he was treated in St. Louis and Tennessee hospitals without much relief. (7) (8 )

 

 

March of 1863 saw the 80th regiment moving along the Mississippi River to join General Grant’s forces at Vicksburg where there is a special monument erected in honor of the 80th.  In June of 1864 the men joined with Sherman on the March to the Sea and took part in the Siege of Savannah.  The men took part in many other campaigns as the Great Rebellion started coming to an end.  At some point President Lincoln saw his regiment and it has been reported by his grandson (my father) that James shook hands with the 16th president. (I have been unable to document a time or location that this could have taken place.) (9)  James was honorably discharged on May 27, 1865 in Washington D.C.

 

James married Barbara Shryock in the mid 1860s.  She was born in Guernsey County, Ohio to George Shryock and Abigail Easter about 1843.  Barbara (also listed as Barbary in some documents) and James had one son, Edward, and two daughters, Belle and Lucina. Barbara died on July 10, 1872.  Soon, Frances V. Ogan, was helping James take care of his house and his children.  She gave birth to the first of their eight children in April 1873 – one month prior to their marriage.  The couple married on May 26, 1873 by J.P. Robinson in Washington, Guernsey County, Ohio. (10)  The family included besides Florus Allen (named after his grandfather) b. 21 Apr 1873 – John W. (b. 31 Aug 1874), Alford Elmer (b. about 1878), James W. (b. 20 Jun 1879), Julia Ann (b. 20 Sep 1880 – named after her grandmother), Ella M. (b. 22 Jun 1882), Charles (b. 1884), and Alva Lester (b. 9 May 1886).

 

The family is found in the 1880 Census living in Tuscarawas Twp, Coshocton County, Ohio on June 9, 1880.  This is the only record of Alford E. at age 2 years old as he died at the age of 4. (11)  Charles would only have been recorded in the 1890 census as he died at age 12 in 1896 due to a farm accident.  (12) In 1900 the family is recorded living in Bethlehem Twp, Coshocton County, Ohio on June 14, 1900. James listed his birthplace as Ohio and that his father was born in Connecticut and his mother born in Ohio.  He owned his home and it was not mortgaged.  Frances listed that she was the mother of eight children and only six were living.  In addition to their children living with them, the household also included Mary J. Ruby (listed as Ward).  Mary was James’ granddaughter – child of his daughter Belle and her husband Thomas Ruby. (13)  On April 15, 1910 the family is enumerated as living at 423 N. Eleventh Street in Tuscarawas Twp, Coshocton County, Ohio.  Besides Frances, their son, (Alva) Lester and his wife, Mary (Lucy Besser) together with their son Arthur, were living with them. (14)

 

The family not only had lost two of their sons, Charles and Elmer, but also their oldest daughter, Julia.  She and Percy J. Tuttle had married on Christmas Day 1906.  Almost a year later she died from blood poisoning following childbirth.  The baby lived only a few hours. (15)

 

On February 18, 1915 Frances died of Pulmonary Tuberculosis at the age of 68 years, 2 months, 19 days.  She was buried two days later in Prairie Chapel Cemetery in Roscoe, Coshocton County, Ohio near her daughter. (16)

 

James is found still living in Tuscarawas Twp in the 1920 US Census dated Jan. 8, 1920.  Also in the household are his son, (Alva) Lester, daughter-in-law, Mary Lucy, granddaughter, Georgia and grandson, Jerrold. (17)

 

Soon after that he went back and forth between living with his kids and the Ohio Soldiers and Sailors Home in Sandusky, Ohio.  His granddaughter, Marie, wrote, “My mother’s father, James House, lived with his kids off and on when he got older and when he couldn’t stand the kids, he would go to the Ohio Vets home in Sandusky.  I think he had T.B. in his later years because when he lived with us (I remember him) Mom used to scald all the dishes he used.” (18 )

 

James passed away at the age of 82 on October 1, 1924 at the home of my grandparents, Lloyd and Ella (House) Amore on West Lafayette Road in Coshocton County.  His obituary stated that he was a member of the United Brethren Church.  He was buried with his wife, Frances, at Prairie Chapel Cemetery.  He left behind four sons, three daughters, three sisters, and numerous grandchildren. (19)

 

My great-grandfather had enough influence on his grandson that he was proud to carry the name James as his middle name in honor of him.  I wish I could see a picture of James in order to see what this man who fought in the civil war looked like.  And to know that he served in the military under my favorite president and one I have studied, is thrilling.

 

Rest in Peace, Great-Grandfather.

 

 

Footnotes:

(1) Information from Florence Wenk Woodard Barrett, descendant of Nelson W. House, son of Allen and Editha House.

(2)  1820 US Census

(3) Related by Descendant of Nelson W. House

(4) Government Land Records (digitized copy in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(5) 1850 US Census (digitized copy in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(6) 1860, 1870, 1880 US Censuses (digitized copies in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(7) James House’s Declaration for an Original Invalid Pension, 6 Sep 1887 (copies from National Archives in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(8 ) Special Pathology and Diagnostics with Therapeutic Hints By Sigmund Raue, C. G. Raue

Published by B. Jain Publishers, 2002

ISBN 8170210798, 9788170210795

Pages 436-427

(found on books.google.com)

(9) 80th Ohio Volunteer Infantry

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~keller/ovi80/work/index.html

Charles Paul Keller, author of the website (his source is: from Volume 6, Ohio Roster Commission; Official roster of the soldiers of the state of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861 – 1866; Cincinnati, Wilstach, Baldwin & Co. 1886-95.)

(10) Dept. of the Interior; Bureau of Pensions

Certificate No. 418793 (copy from National Archives in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(11) 1880 US Census (digitized copy in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(12) Letter written by Alva Lester House to his niece, Gertrude Amore Shackelford, dated January 25, 1963.  (Copy is owned by Wendy Littrell.)

(13) 1900 US Census (digitized copy in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(14) 1910 US Census (digitized copy in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(15) Newspaper; Coshocton Age; Thursday, November 28, 1907 (digitized copy in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(16) State of Ohio, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Certificate of Death, Number 6761 (digitized copy in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(17) 1920 US Census (digitized copy in possession of Wendy Littrell)

(18 ) Email from Marie Quirk to Wendy Littrell on Feb. 9, 2000

(19) Coshocton Newspaper (digitized copy in possession of Wendy Littrell)

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Today I have actually tried to do more research than work on my goals for the Genea-Blogger Group Games.  I did write one post that I scheduled to be posted at another time (part of Write! Write! Write!).  The research I was doing today consisted of gathering information so I could write a thorough biography on one of my ancestors.  I will either be writing about my maternal grandfather, Col. Glen R. Johnson, or my paternal great-grandfather, James Emory House.  Both of them were military veterans.  Grandad (Glen) served from WWI through the Korean War and James was a Civil War infantryman.  Since writing about my grandfather would be much easier because he lived until I was in my 20s and I knew him personally, it may challenge me to write about a man I didn’t know and don’t have much information about except for what my dad and aunt have told me.

So stay tuned to see what decision I’ve made.

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