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http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AJohnHollisterHouseGlastonburyCT.png

The John Hollister House in Glastonbury, Connecticut was built about 1649 according to “The HIstorical Society of Glastonbury” (Architecture page). It is located at 14 Tryon Street. This was the ancestral home for the Hollister family for many generations.  Lieutenant John Hollister was born in 1612 in England and came to America around 1642 (1). Lt. Hollister married Joanna Treat, daughter of Richard and Joanna Treat, and eight children were born to this union: Elizabeth, John Jr, Thomas, Joseph, Lazarus, Mary, Sarah, and Stephen. Hollister Sr. died after April 3. 1665 and left a will naming his widow and living children and the children of daughter, Elizabeth. His burial location is unknown.

John and Joanna Hollister are my 8th great-grandparents through their son, John Jr. He married Sarah Goodrich and through their son Thomas who married Dorothy Hills. Their daughter, Hannah Hollister, married William House and through their son, my 4th great-grandfather, Lazarus House. He married Rebecca Risley and their son, Allen House, married Editha Bigelow. Their son, Florus Allen House, married Julia Ann Lewis, and their son, James Emory House, was the father of my paternal grandmother, Ella Maria House, with his second wife, Frances Virginia Ogan.

My House and Hollister ancestors all lived in Hartford, Connecticut since the mid-1600’s. They were founders of Wethersfield and many are buried in the Ancient Burying Ground in Hartford county. I would like to visit the area to walk the same places they did; view the historical John Hollister House; and pay my respects to all my many times great-grandparents in the cemeteries there.

 

(1). The Hollister Family of America: Lieut. John Hollister, of Wethersfield, Conn., and His Descendants; Case, Lafayette Wallace; 1886; Fergus Printing Company; p 19; Digitzed 19 Sep 2006; American Libraries; Internet Archive.

 

(Photo credt: Connecticut Historical Society)

Mom and I at Hocking Hills State Park

When I was not quite eight years old, my parents took me to Old Man’s Cave in the Hocking Hills State Park area located in southeastern Ohio in Logan county. The drive seemed very long to me but was probably about two and a half hours away.  We stayed in a motel during our short weekend getaway. Mom and Dad were always taking me places when I was young – more before I started school. Once I was in school, we’d take side trips on weekends – hiking at Hueston Woods just west of Dayton, Ft. Ancient near Lebanon, Ohio, or to visit my Aunt Gertie in Zanesville. For holidays we might go to see my mom’s brother, my Uncle Glen, in Battle Creek, Michigan, or to the Detroit area to visit two of my dad’s brothers.

Reading the sign at Ft. Ancient in the Fall of 1969

I’m sure when we went on sight-seeing excursions, Mom and Dad would hope I came away learning something new. Most of that information has been long forgotten but sometimes, when I see pictures, I remember the trips and the fun.

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Mom and I in Battle Creek, Michigan at Thanksgiving 1969

 

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Unknown Boy – Charcoal/Pencil Drawing
Size: 16×20
Found amongst other drawings (corresponding to actual photographs)
Probably a member of the Johnson/Goul/Blazer or Wilt family

(Unknown artist; original drawing in possession of Wendy Littrell, Address for private use)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania conjurs up thoughts of the Declaration of Independence, the Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, Benjamin Franklin, Betsy Ross, the Founding Fathers, and even the movie “National Treasure.” My first trip to Philadelphia was in about 1965 when I was about four years old. Not only were we going to visit some of the places I mentioned but also to visit my dad’s sister, Marie. On the way from Dayton to Phlly, we stopped in Hershey and toured the chocolate-maker’s manufacturing plant (this was before OSHA and other laws prevented a tour right by the gigantic vats of milk chocolate!). As a young chid, I was fascinated with the street lights shaped like Hersey Kisses candy! We left with oodles of chocolate and other candy.

We stayed at my Aunt Marie’s for at least two nights and also enjoyed the sights of Philadelphia.

My Aunt Marie

Carpenter’s Hall

From Pennsylvania, we went to Manhattan and while my dad had business meetings, Mom and I saw the Rockettes, Rockefeller Center, and shopped at  department stores.  One of my mom’s class mates (and sister to my uncle’s wife) lived on Long Island, so we spent a day visiting them and taking a ferry boat ride out by the Statue of Liberty. Either going East or returning home, we stopped at the Gettysburg National Military Park.

Many years later, as a high school student the summer before my Junior year, I went with my church’s Youth Fellowship back to Philadelphia. We stopped on the way in Johnstown and spent the night at a church and then on to Lancaster and spent two days sight-seeing and enjoying the hospitality of a family who opened their home for 22 of us kids and many adult sponsors plus our Christian Education director and the minister and his family. Then on to Philly to walk the cobblestone streets, visit Christ Church, get a close up view of the Liberty Bell, and tour Independence Hall. We saw the home of Betsy Ross and the U.S. Mint. Outside of town we took mine cars deep into the coal and iron ore mine.

Now, I would like to visit again, but this time with the knowledge that some of my ancestors lived near to Philadelphia before the Founding Fathers set quill to parchment with their signatures on the Declaration of Independence.

 

wampler coat of arms

Eva Wampler, my 5th great-grandmother on my mother’s side, was born to Hans Peter Wampler Jr. and Anna Maria Brenneissen in Botetourt county, Virginia on June 2, 1738 (1). Her parents were both born in Germany (Hans Peter Jr. from what is now Bas-Rihn, France and Anna Maria from Sishelm, Germany). Family lore passed down has been told of Eva being kidnapped by Indians as a young girl and then returned as a teenager – again the ages at which these events occurred are not without inconsistencies.

From History of the City of Dayton and Montgomery County, Ohio, Volume 1 (Drury, Augustus Waldo; S.J. Clark Publishing Company; 1901; p. 762) an account reads: “Eva Wampler born in Boutecourt county Virginia in 1738 was at the age of seven stolen by the Indians. When about fourteen she was returned to her parents but seemed to have utterly forgotten all that she had known of the English language. She recognized melodies sung to revive her memories but seemed unable to understand the language spoken about her. After a time she was out with her father who was building a fence. As he was going to get a rail she called out ‘I ll fetch that rail’ and from that moment all of her childhood was brought back to her.  At the age of twenty two she was married to Henry Kinsey and brought up a family of six children.”

What is known: Eva married Henry Kinsey in Ohio. He was born in 1735 in Pennsylvania. The couple had six children. John Kinsey (b. 1762) married Anna Wagamon and died in 1846. Hannah Kinsey (b. 1764) married Jacob Wolf and died about 1856. Mary Kinsey (b. 1768) married Peter Hackman and died about 1839. Sarah Salome Kinsey (my ancestor) (b. 1774) married Johannes (Kohler) Caylor and died in 1853. Elizabeth Kinsey (b. 1775) married Daniel Graybill and died in 1848. Abraham Kinsey (b. 1787) married Mary Magdalene Wagner and died  in 1872.

Eva died in 1821 in Montgomery county, Ohio and Henry followed her in death about a year later.

There are so many published reports concerning the Wampler/Wampfler family, that I have not had time to read everything. That is something I want to do in order to better understand the circumstances this family faced and how events in history shaped their migration – not only of the family that immigrated to America but from Virginia to Ohio. I wonder about all the adversity Eva and her family had to conquer; what her fears were while she was a captive, what she did to survive, and how that shaped the rest of her life – especially if she was an overprotective mother always making sure she knew where her childen were.

From Eva, I am descended from her daughter, Sarah Salome, through her son, Abraham Caylor, through his daughter, Nancy Caylor, through her daughter, Martha Jane Stern, through her daughter – my maternal grandmother – Vesta Christena Wilt, through her daughter – my mother – Mary Helen Johnson.

(Image of the Coat of Arms from The Wampler/Wampfler Genealogy Web Site; maintained by John E. Wampler; Georgia; 2011) No copyright infringement intended.

(1) Date of Eva’s death is only speculation as there are several accounts that offer conflicting reports. [The Puzzle of Eva Wampler; "The Wampler/Wampfler Genealogy Web Site"; John E. Wampler; 2001; http://www.wf-page.net [The Puzzle of Eva Wampler, Revisted; "The Wampler/Wampfler Genealogy Web Site"; John E. Wampler; 2011; http://www.wf-page.net

Labor Day in Photos

labor-day-parade

According to Wikipedia, Labor Day became an official holiday in 1887 to celebrate the “American labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of their country.”

As a child, Labor Day meant that school was right around the corner, as was Halloween, sweater weather, and hot chocolate. It was a day for one last cookout of the summer; one last day in the pool before the weather turned; one last bike ride in shorts and T-shirt; and one last night of children running through the backyards catching lightning bugs. As an adult, the holiday has meant a three day weekend and a day to sleep in.

Today, I am honoring the holiday with photos of ancestors at work or their places of business.

clawsonstore

This is the store my maternal grandmother’s stepfather ran in Anderson, Indiana.

grandadinuniform

My maternal grandfather, Glen R. Johnson, in uniform. One of the many pictures I have during his career in the U.S. Air Force.

dadwork1

My dad and two others in front of the place he worked when he was stationed in Japan (mid-1950s)

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My mom, Mary (Johnson) Amore, at her desk at the Greene County (Ohio) Senior Center – mid 1990s

HAPPY LABOR DAY!

(Labor Day image courtesty of Gifs.cc – Free Labor Day Clipart)

death and funerals image

Benjamin L House, 89, of 1124 E. Main St., died at 8:30 a.m. today in County Memorial Hospital.

Born in Coshocton county Aug. 24, 1890, he was the son of William R & Margaret Davisson House. He was the last of a family of three brothers and three sisters.

Mr. House received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Union College, Lincoln Nebraska and a Bachelor of Theology Degree from Pacific Union College in California.

He served as a college teacher for 15 years in Nebraska, California, and Texas. He was a public lecturer in several states.

Surviving are his widow, the former Anna Ruby Burch; stepchildren, Charles Burch of Birmingham Michigan and Mrs. John (Juanita) Kah of Coshocton; two sons, Harold House of Mexico City, and Dr. Leland House, Los Angeles, Calif; two daughters, Evelyn Moran of Loma Linda, Calif. and Esther Gossart of Riverside California, by a former marriage.

Mr. House spent his boyhood days in Coshocton county, for 20 years he was a state employee. he was a member of the Ohio Civil Service Employees Association, having served as secretary treasurer for the Coshocton County Chapter for many years. He was a member of the Seventh Day Adventist Church.

Services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday at Dawson Funeral Home in charge of Elder Ocee R Heaton. Burial; will be in South Lawn Cemetery.

Published: Coshocton Tribune (Coshocton, Ohio); Wednesday, Oct. 15, 1969.

Benjamin Longdon House, my first cousin twice removed, was first married to Maynie Wells in Cuyahoga county. The digital image of their marriage license and certificate [Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1997," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-17963-39865-92?cc=1614804 : accessed 30 Aug 2014), Cuyahoga > Marriage records 1903 vol 56 > image 175 of 302.] call in to question the birthdate in the obituary. On July 3, 1903 Benjamin lists his age as 22 putting his birth about 1891 or 1892 – a good eight years earlier than the 1890 year listed on the obituary. To make sure this is the same man, I looked at his parents’ names and his occupation – listed as clergyman, as well as his birth place – Coshocton, Ohio. Perhaps someday, there will be an explanation as to why these dates are skewed. Maynie Wells was the daughter of Franklin Wells and May Perkins. From this marriage, two daughters – Esther and Evelyn – and two sons – Harold and Leland – were born. I have not found any death or divorce information, but Benjamin went on to marry Anna Elizabeth Ruby Burch on September 29, 1935 in Pleasants county, West Virginia.

Benjamin’s uncle, James Emory House (my great-grandfather), had a daughter by his first marriage – Belle Dora House. Belle married Thomas Ruby and Anna was their daughter; Benjamin and Anna were first cousins once removed (Benjamin and Belle were first cousins). According to the digital image of their marriage license and certificate ["West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FBSR-ZM1 : accessed 30 Aug 2014), Benjamin Longdon House and Anna Elizabeth Burch, Pleasants, West Virginia, United States; citing ; FHL microfilm 867988.], Benjamin is listed as 11 years older than Anna which corresponds to a birth year of 1891 or 1892.

 

 

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