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Archive for the ‘challenge’ Category

The 87th Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy concerns “GeneaResolutions”.  I looked back on my post for the 63rd Edition – I Resolve To . . . in order to see what I had listed as my resolutions concerning genealogy for 2009.

I had listed that I wanted to scan more documents, photos and the rest of my slides – did not quite get there!  I did scan some newly discovered photos but did not get a chance to scan much and certainly did not get my slides scanned.   I wanted to organize my files – absolutely did not do that!  For one thing they are in another room that is being used by another family member and it’s very difficult for me to get to them.  As for my online files, in between being out of state for six weeks this past spring and dealing with a new baby in the house, a lot of my genea-resolutions from last year never got done.

I had also resolved to blog more and take part in more carnivals.  That didn’t happen but not for lack of trying.  I also have not worked on my Graveyard Rabbit Blog – at all this year.

So this year I won’t be as ambitious (which is one reason I don’t ever make personal New Year’s Resolutions!).  So here they are:

  1. Leave comments on each genea-blog I read.  How do the authors know we’ve visited if we never say “hi”!
  2. Write at least one blog post every two weeks – since I know I won’t have time to write every week or every day.  I am going to try to write several posts to be published throughout my “down” time.
  3. Pick another branch of my family to research – this will get me out of the rut of looking at the same people and getting the same results. 
  4. Write one biography on an ancestor in the next three months.
  5. Write another chapter in my “Goul” family history.

When the year is up, I want to be able to say that I completed all five of these resolutions!

(CoG Illustration courtesy of footnoteMaven!)

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leaving battlecreek

When my dad got orders for Japan in the early ’50s, he went ahead of the rest of the family.  Mom had to get from Ohio to the Pacific Coast in order to sail to Japan. 

The photo at left was taken when my mom, brother and sister were leaving my Uncle’s home in Michigan headed west.  They drove 450 miles in one day and got to Fargo, North Dakota about 6:15 p.m.  In a postcard to her folks, Mom said they stayed at a cabin for the night – the cost: $4.  They traveled through Montana and went to Oregon in order to visit my great-grandmother for a short time.hughgaffey naval ship  Then north to Seattle to Fort Lawton where they had to wait a few days before sailing to Japan on June 9, 1953. 

The trip, aboard the USNS General Hugh J. Gaffey, would take 12 days – although by crossing the international date line, they lost a day.  While on board, my sister tap danced in a Variety show and my brother – when not seasick – made friends.  The ship carried 2400 troops – all on their way to Yokohama. 

dad_nash

trainMy parents were in Japan for two tours and while there, they drove the Nash that had been transported via ship with them.  Sometimes they jim school busrode a train like the one pictured (left) and my siblings rode a bus (right) back and forth to school or on field trips.

While on their 2nd tour in Japan, my parents and brother all learned to fly courtesy of the Tachikawa Aero Club.  They even “starred” in a short film promoting the Aero Club Family Plan.  Back in the States and after I came along, my parents still flew every once in awhile.  Here’s a picture of my Dad in ’72 getting ready to fly.dad by plane

My parents had some very interesting adventures in the air and on land.  I feel very blessed that not only do I have stories and pictures, but memories of when I accompanied them on some of their adventures!

Written for the 18th Edition of Smile for the Camera – Travel.

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Extra! Extra!   Read all about how the case of Chase began at the town on the river spending days of childhood on the water and wandering through a haunted graveyard.  Though independent from birth, there was still time for the furry and feathered family members or calling on dear St. Nicholas.  Often taking time to share, show and explain traditions or statistics on age in the books for genealogy.  When friends would meet Mom, they understood her senior moments talking about the great Texas snow. Often explanations would be given about the American political road map with exclamations of “What a bunch of hooey!”  However, when we get together for the Carnival, I resolve to only say, “Oh Yeah! Oh Yeah!” and we are not just horsin’ around.


Carnival:

  • Cruise?
  • Rides and Games?
  • Rio?
  • Parades?
  • Mardi Gras?

If you chose none of the above, you are correct!!!  In the blogosphere, the word carnival takes on a whole new meaning – well sort of!  Generally a blog carnival is a repository for many contributors’ blog posts centered around a chosen theme.  In the genealogy blog world, there are several types of “carnivals” in which to participate – Cabinet of Curiosities”, Carnival of Central and Eastern European Genealogy, Irish Heritage and Culture, and several others.

Three years ago, Jasia who authors Creative Gene wrote Carnival of Genealogy, Edition 1. This Carnival is now in its 84th Edition. The topic for this edition is “What has the Carnival of Genealogy Meant to You?”

Creative Gene was one of the first Genealogy Blogs I bookmarked and read each day.  Soon, I was clicking on the links to others’ blogs and soon bookmarked several of them.  I read with interest the CoG’s and soon realized that not only were others submitting articles that more people would read but sometimes connections were being made.  I knew that if I were to get more than just a few readers (and possibly some connections, too), I should participate in the CoG’s.  I enjoy writing and knew that should I undertake a project writing biographies of my ancestors, I should start writing and reading others’ articles.

My first submission to the CoG was for the 47th Edition, published on May 3, 2008 with the theme “A Place Called Home”.  My entry was The Town on the River. Wow! After some research and writing and re-writing, I had an article of which I could be proud! Jasia even extended a warm welcome to me and encouraged everyone to welcome this “newbie” to the Carnival!

Since that first entry, I’ve participated in numbers 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 78, and 79 (see top paragraph – all my titles are incorporated into the opening!).  There have been a wide variety of topics and several others besides Jasia have hosted.  I have not hosted a CoG – that is something I would have to look into and make sure that if I do volunteer to host that I have the time to make sure it is done properly. 

I’ve had several favorite topics.  Lately I haven’t been able to find the time to put in research in order to write an indepth post for some of them.  My favorites have been: The Case of Chase written for the 53rd Edition. The theme was “Carousel” – any genealogy topic was fair game. I had spent quite a bit of time on my article and included pictures and documented evidence information. This article brought four comments from others – two of them descendents of the man I wrote about – people I didn’t think existed! Another favorite entry was Independent from Birth for the 51st Edition.

I’ve read articles in the CoG that have touched my heart, sparked an interest, and given me new research techniques to think about and investigate.  Unfortunately, I’m unable to think of just one that would be the all time stand-out – there are so many talented writers and enthusiastic genealogists for me to pick just one!

I generally encourage my readers to check out or submit articles to the CoG.  The more the merrier!  And it’s always wonderful when someone new begins submitting articles.

The Carnival of Genealogy has enabled me to go above and beyond just gathering names, dates and places.  I have delved into the lives of those that I’ve written about – trying to capture their emotions, joys, and hardships.  Reading others’ articles has given me new avenues to investigate and research when hunting for that “brick wall” ancestor.

The impact on my life has been two-fold.  One – I’ve been able to meet new friends and some distant cousins.  By reading some of the articles and seeing a common surname, I’ve made connections.  The second aspect has been aiding me in becoming a more thorough researcher and writer.

I’d like to extend my thanks to all of the genea-bloggers who have commented on my articles; who have pointed me in other directions for information; to those who capture my interest with their thought provoking, informative and heart-touching stories; and to Jasia who first introduced me to the Carnival of Genealogy!  You folks are great!

And for all of you who think you can’t write an article for the CoG – just try it once!  You may learn something new about yourself!

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Most genealogy programs include reference numbers – either pre-programmed or entered manually. Today I decided to look up all those in my family file with reference #’s that include numbers that correspond to today’s date.

Dorcas Elizabeth Stropel - born Unknown (around 1800-1813) and died Unknown.  Wife of David Bushong, Jr.  Mother of Jacob, George Emmanuel, (twins) David III & Joseph, John and three daughters.  Dorcas is the wife of my 2nd cousin 6 times removed.  Reference #: 1105

Oliver P. Bookless – born Jan. 15, 1820 in Coshocton County, Ohio and died Oct. 30, 1897 in Sheldon, Iroquois County, Illinois.  Husband to Emily Lister and father of Rebecca Ann, Emily J., Leonard, James and William. Oliver is my 3rd great-grand-uncle.  Reference #: 11050

Alexander Bookless - born about 1824 and died Mar. 9, 1902 in Iroquois County, Illinois.  Husband of Sarah (Unknown) and father of Sedora, Mattie C., William, Mary E., and Emily M.  He is my 3rd great-grand-uncle.  Reference #: 11051

Emily Lister – born about 1830 in Indiana and died Dec. 3, 1896 in Sheldon, Iroquois County, Illinois.  Wife of Oliver P. Bookless (see above). She is the wife of my 3rd great-grand-uncle.  Reference #: 11052

Rebecca Ann Bookless - born about 1850 and died Unknown. Daughter of Oliver P. Bookless and Emily Lister.  Wife of Mr. Edwards.  She is my 1st cousin 4 times removed.  Reference #: 11053

Leonard Bookless - born July 9, 1859 in Sheldon, Iroquois County, Illinois and died Apr. 14, 1924 in Sheldon, Iroquois County, Illinois.  Son of Oliver P. Bookless and Emily Lister. Husband of Dicie Fry. Father of Virgil, Loretta, Vernie & Cleota.  He is my 1st cousin 4 times removed.  Reference #: 11058

James Bookless - born Oct. 15, 1866 in Sheldon, Iroquois County, Illinois and died Apr. 10, 1921 in St. Charles, Illinois. Son of Oliver P. Bookless and Emily Lister and husband of Emma Gillfillan.  Father of Earl, Ernest and Bernice.  He is my 1st cousin 4 times removed.  Reference #: 11059

Emily J. Bookless - born about 1854 and died Unknown. Daughter of Oliver P. Bookless and Emily Lister. Wife of Mr. Edwards.  Emily is my 1st cousin 4 times removed.  Reference #: 11056

Bessie Connor - born in 1889 and died Unknown. Wife of James Scott Bookless and mother of Keith and Ruth.  She is the wife of my 1st cousin 3 times removed.  Reference #: 11105

Elivina Blazer - born and died Unknown. Daughter of Samuel Blazer and Prudence Collins.  She is my 1st cousin 4 times removed.  Reference: 11054

Elvira Blazer - born and died Unknown.  Daughter of Samuel Blazer and Prudence Collins. Wife of James McFadden.  She is my 1st cousin 4 times removed.  Reference #: 11057

Jesse W. Walker – born about 1842 in Rush County, Indiana and died Unknown.  Son of Hiram Walker and Nancy Mullis.  He is my 1st cousin 3 times removed.  Reference #: 11055

The date: 11/05 is in each of the reference numbers – perhaps with an added number before or after.  How many can you find in your family tree with the date?

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I’m a day late with Saturday Night Genealogy Fun that Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings posted last night.  The challenge was to list the number of descendents of one of the four sets of great-grandparents, how many are living or deceased, and how many we’ve met.

Reunion of the Amore – Werts Family 1924

My paternal great-grandparents, William Henry Amore (“Henry”) and Mary Angelina Werts (Annie) have over 457 descendents!  They had:

  • Children: 7 (Clemmie, Zade, Rollo, Clarence, Lloyd – my grandfather, Bert, and Roy) – all deceased

Wmamore

Back: Bert, Rollo, Zade, Clarence, Lloyd
Front: Roy, Henry, Annie, Clemmie

  • Grandchildren: 36 (Clemmie – 4, Zade – 1, Rollo – 3, Clarence – 2, Lloyd – 8, Bert – 5, Roy -13); Deceased: 30

amorefamily1

Gene (my dad), Paul, Bervil, Ella (my grandmother), Gail, Norman, Lloyd (my grandfather), Gertrude, Marie

  • Great-grandchildren: 122 (26 Known – Deceased
  • 2nd great-grandchildren: 166 (10 Known – Deceased)
  • 3rd great-grandchildren: 113
  • 4th great-grandchildren: 13

I’ve met: 

  • Five of the children (my grandfather’s four brothers) – Clarence, Roy, Zade, Rollo, & Bert.  My grandfather and his sister were both deceased by the time I was born.
  • Some of the children of my grandfather’s siblings and their grandchildren – but I was young so I don’t remember names.
  • Almost all of my grandfather’s descendents – my dad’s siblings and their children (my first cousins) – who due to the wide age range – are much older than me.  Some of my first cousins’ grandchildren I’ve never met.

 I’ve had the good fortune to meet one 1st cousin I didn’t know I had a couple of years ago and continue to correspond with her via Facebook and email.  Some of the distant Amore relatives have also contacted me via email or by phone after receiving a query letter from me several years ago.  I feel very blessed that we continue our familial relationship even if it is through email or Facebook.

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Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings, who took an idea from Leland Metzler of Genealogy Blog, posted his Saturday Night Fun yesterday and it is about Satisfying Genealogy Moments.

The most thrilling parts of researching my ancestry are hearing and/or finding distant cousins – especially those whom I didn’t even know existed.  Case in point – a child put up for adoption by a great-aunt, an uncle’s child that no one ever knew about, children of a woman I thought had lived as a nun her entire life (but didn’t!), and descendents of my maternal great-grandmother’s sister!  Not only have I connected with these people, but we shared information and still email each other.

Another exciting aspect of digging into my roots is when I find documentation and proof of a relationship.  Family lore and stories are one thing but to see an actual document that proves those stories is a “stand up and cheer” moment!  I’ve had many of those over the course of the last 10 years.

Hopefully I will make contact with more distant relatives and uncover much more documentation as I continue my quest!

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Randy Seaver (who is lacking a good internet connection now – he’s having to pay a horrible price for just a little bit of connection time) has still posted the Saturday Night Genealogy Fun: Ahnentafel Roulette on his blog, Genea-Musings.

1. How old is my father: 88

2. Divide that number by 4: 22

3. The person on my Ahnentafel chart that is #22 is: Evan Ogan (my note: Oh, of all the people!!!)

4. Three facts about that person:

  1. Evan, born 1785 in Culpepper County, Virginia, is the foster father of my paternal g-grandmother, Frances V. (Ogan) House. 
  2. He married Susannah Fritter in 1807.
  3. He is found living in Rich Hill, Muskingum County, Ohio in the 1850 Census; in Spencer, Guernsey County, Ohio in the 1860 Census; living with his son, Lot, in Meigs Twp, Muskingum County, Ohio in the 1870 Census.
  4. Evan died when he was 88 (abt. 1879) at the home of his youngest son in Meigs Twp, Muskingum County, Ohio (presumably that son was Lot) – cause of death was paralysis (according to his obituary).

So I listed 4 facts.  My great-grandmother, Frances Ogan, lived with Evan and Susannah since the 1850 Census – she was listed as Frances Foster.  I may never know whether or not Frances was related to them, if they knew her parents, or if the family lore is accurate: that she was left on a doorstep.

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