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Thanksgiving Meme

thanksgiving

My newfound cousin, Julie Cahill Tarr, at GenBlog, began a Thanksgiving meme and tagged me. The challenge is to write a blog post listing 2 things I’m thankful for and tag a person to spread the love.

I am thankful for having the best husband in the world who has been my rock for over 20 years; my parents, my four beautiful kids and three grandkids, my sister, niece, nephews, and extended family who I remain close to in spirit even if miles separate us.

I am thankful for being able to visit my mom for a second time this year.  Since my visits are usually a year apart, being able to see her four months after my last visit – especially at this time of year – was a wonderful blessing.

I am going to tag A. Spence of Spence-Lowry Family History.  Julie’s instructions for this meme are:

  1. Write a blog post telling us about 2 things you are thankful for.
  2. You can post the Thanksgiving Day banner above in your post if you like.
  3. Tag one person to spread the love.  Post a comment on their blog so they know they’ve been tagged.
  4. Send a link to your blog post by 11/25 to Julie at:  genblogjulie@gmail.com.

 Julie will post all submissions on 11/26!  Happy Thanksgiving!

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I posted a few days ago about my new found cousin, Julie Cahill Tarr, of GenBlog. Today my other new found cousin, Becky Wiseman of Kinexxions posted her line back to Richard Treat – our common ancestor.

When I first entered the genea-blogging world back in the early spring, little did I realize that some of the people who I met in this wonderful community would turn out to be distant relatives – not to mention blogging friends. On GenBlog, Julie writes that she

. . . started this blog to share my genealogy research with others. Mini-bios of family members is my main focus. However, I also plan to share research challenges and successes, hint and tips I learn along the way, and participate in various carnivals and memes to add variety.

Julie is researching and preserving the past of the Cahill, Miller, McMahon, Rottman, Stoffel, Wach, & Webster families (and over 1,000 other twigs)! She is also the owner of Design Write Communications in Central Illinois.

Becky considers herself a GeneaHistorian and is a native Hoosier (which is great since a lot of my ancestors on my maternal grandparents side lived in Indiana!). She served in the U.S. Navy and also writes Whitley County Kinexxions. Becky’s web site is Kinexxions – Kin Connections. Her blog states:

Kinexxions will be presenting the History and Heritage of my ancestors and their kin, many of whom settled in the Northern Indiana counties of Elkhart, Kosciusko, and Whitley.

Maybe I’m a little biased, especially now that we are “kin”, but I urge you to go check out Julie’s and Becky’s sites and blogs. Two very talented ladies that I’m proud to call my cousins!

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Slow Posting

Things have been terribly busy on my end for the last week – which explains why I haven’t posted as much (or what!) I’ve wanted to. Had a toddler grandchild stay with me this weekend so have had extra stuff to deal with. Last week I put over 100 miles on my van in one day – just playing chauffeur. Posting will resume shortly and I’m thankful everyone has been patient with me!

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Earlier today I became a member of the Association of Graveyard Rabbits!  I will post a link to my Graveyard Rabbit blog on the right.  Soon I will begin posting about Cemeteries, Tombstones, and Burial Customs in South Denton County (Texas).  I hope you’ll stop by and perhaps leave a comment or two!  Please find me also at Graveyard Rabbit of South Denton County!

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More Blogs to Visit

Thanks to the genea-blogger meme that was started a few days ago as well as the “Dare to Comment” Challenge, I’ve had comments from some genea-bloggers that are new to me!  I’m adding them (and some others that I have failed to add before now!) to my blogroll over on the right and I urge you to go visit their blogs if you haven’t already!

I’ll be adding:

  1. Genealogy Traces written by Judy Shubert
  2. Heritage Happens written by Mysteri
  3. Apple’s Tree written by Apple
  4. DearMYRTLE’s Genealogy Blog written by DearMYRTLE
  5. The Educated Genealogist written by Sheri Fenley
  6. Sandusky History written by the Sandusky (Ohio) Library
  7. Jessica’s Genejournal written by Jessica Oswalt
  8. Elyse’s Genealogy Blog written by Elyse Doerflinger

What new blogs have you stumbled across recently?

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Kathryn Lake Hogan, of LOOKING4ANCESTORS offered a Fun Friday challenge that dares us to comment on at least 10 blogs – some favorites and some new.

I’ve been catching up on my genea-blog reading and trying to comment on those I’ve read.  This is my list:

1. footnoteMaven on the post Maria Bash and the Spirit Hoax

2. Creative Gene on the post Blog Action Day 2008 – Poverty

3. The Educated Genealogist on the post Practicing What I Preach

4. Heritage Happens on this post It Tickles My Funny Bone (A new blog to me)

5. In My Life on this post The Green Chair (A new blog to me)

6. Life’s Journey on this post Japanese Cherry Trees around the Washington Tidal Basin (A new blog to me)

7. Thomas 2.0 – Genealogy on his list of Surnames. Thomas new blog is new to me although I greatly enjoy reading Destination: Austin Family

8. Walking the Berkshires on this post Halcyon Days

9. Moultrie Creek on this post Land of the Trembling Earth

10. Genealogy Traces on this post Lucy Puckett and Cowart Children Die From 1918 Influenza (New to me blog)

So I urge to you go check out these blogs and the posts and please leave comments where ever you visit!  Care to leave me a comment?

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Apparently, Randy at GeneaMusings started a meme. He tagged Jasia at Creative Gene, who in turn tagged me! Before I write out mine, you can go to Jasia’s post and read her answers. Or go to Randy’s post and read his.

Okay, here goes!

10 Years Ago I:
1. Was waiting for my oldest daughter to graduate high school
2. Had been working at my (present) job 9 months
3. Was planning to attend my 20th high school reunion
4. Made some of my own clothes
5. Enjoyed making homemade bread and egg noodles

5 Things on Today’s “To Do” List: (will update as I complete!)
1. Run Errands
2. Update Web sites
3. Plan my Bible Study Lesson
4. Send an anniversary card to my sister & brother-in-law
5. Watch the last Presidential Debate

5 Snacks I Enjoy:
1. Jalapeno bombers from Church’s chicken
2. Frozen Yogurt
3. McDonald’s Chocolate shakes
4. Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte
5. Swiss Cheese

5 Places I Have Lived:
1. Beavercreek, Ohio
2. Lewisville, Texas
3. Denton, Texas
4. Grapevine, Texas
5. Kettering, Ohio

5 Jobs I’ve Had:
1. Prep for a Catering Company
2. Waitress
3. Graphic Artist/Designer
4. Clerk
5. After Market Sales Rep

5 Genea-bloggers I’m Passing This On To:
1. Jeanna at RootsReading
2. A. Spence at Spence-Lowry Family History
3. Nikki-ann at Notes of Life
4. M. Diane Rogers at CanadaGenealogy or ‘Jane’s Your Aunt’
5. Janet Iles at Janet the researcher

Please post your Meme and tag others!

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Blog Action Day is October 15th and (in my opinion) couldn’t have come at a more appropriate time. Not only due to the current circumstances of the United States’ and the World’s economic situation but because October has generally been the month of the year when horrible things have happened to the stock market.

In the news of late, there is a lot of blame going around.  Is it the banks’ fault?  Is it the mortgage companies’ fault?  Is it Washington’s fault?  Is it the fault of those who are so greedy or seem to want more than they can possibly afford?  Is it just the fault of circumstances beyond our control?  Instead of pointing fingers and dismissing any responsibility we, as individuals might have, it’s time to focus on the positive. 

We are in a positon now to change our own behavior – to learn from not only our personal history but the history of our forebearers.  I didn’t live through the Great Depression of the 1930s, but my parents, grandparents and great-grandparents did.  Through their values, actions and stories, I learned many things. 

Even after the Depression, my grandparents always kept a stock of items that at one time had been hard to come by or had been rationed during World War II (paper and canned goods).  There would be packages upon packages of toilet paper, paper towels, napkins, canned food, dry cleaner bags, re-usable gift wrap, foil, and plastic bags in their closets, pantry and spare bedrooms.  To this day there is a box in my mother’s basement that is filled with dry cleaner bags and saved gift wrap.  Not only were they stocked up but they were saving money by reusing items instead of disposing of so much that would just clog our landfills (this is a pre-recycling era).

My paternal grandparents lived in Coshocton County, Ohio – close to Appalachia and the mining towns.  In fact, my grandfather, Lloyd Amore, some of his brothers and nephews, were miners at one time.  How my grandparents managed to feed all of their children during that time, I don’t know.  They probably didn’t have too much to begin with other than land, a home, basic necessities, and a will to work hard.

My maternal grandparents were part of the military network.  My grandfather, Glen R. Johnson, had begun serving his country during World War I and by 1930 were living in Ohio close to (what was then called) Wright Field (now Wright Patterson Air Force Base).  They were able to receive medical treatment and their groceries from the military services.  My grandparents tried to live a debt-free life except when it came to buying a home and probably a car which I’m sure came from living through the Great Depression.

My great-grandmother, Martha (Stern) Clawson, moved to Washington State from the Midwest before the Stock Market crash of ’29.  She had a garden and there were animals that were slaughtered for meat so they didn’t go hungry. 

As I don’t have too much “fleshed out” information about any ancestors that immigrated from Europe, I can only imagine that they moved from their homeland due to economic, religious, and social reasons.

Today, as we watch stocks plummet and listen to the dire news reports, we can all pledge that when we recover as individuals, that we’ll move forward with a goal to better our situation.  It’s very unpopular to forego the use of cable, digital TV, or sattelite.  What would we watch on the television?  Give up the cell phone with all its bells and whistles?  What happens if someone needs to get in touch with me?  Wait before running out to buy that new appliance, car, electronic toy, or furniture?  How will I compete with the Jones’?  Buy my groceries using coupons, rebates and shopping guides?  Buy clothing or other items from garage sales or resale shops?  What will my neighbors think?  Hang my clothes out to dry on nice and warm days instead of wasting energy drying them?  That takes too much time!  Take a vacation somewhere local or at a more frugal destination instead of that cruise or Disney World Family vacation?  The kids will be upset!

For one thing – we’ve all lived without a lot of things before.  I grew up before cell phones were even around (let alone answering machines!).  People called back!  We had others on emergency lists in case we couldn’t be reached.  We weren’t tied to the office 24 hours a day! 

Libraries have DVDs and movies that can be borrowed.  When regular shows are in reruns and nothing else is on, we throw in a movie to watch as a family.  Better yet – turn the television off (saving energy) and do something as a family – take a walk, ride bikes, play a game, sit outside and enjoy kids being kids!

If your appliance, furniture, etc. isn’t broken, why do you need a new one?  Just to keep up with your friends and neighbors?  So when they go bankrupt and their properties are foreclosed on, will you also try to keep up with them?

Memories are made by what you do – not the most elaborate vacation in the world.  How long do you want to be paying off the credit charges on that once in a lifetime destination? 

It’s time we all take responsibility – not only for our own greed and indebtedness that places so many in danger of bankruptcy and foreclosure, but for the solution to get back to the basics.  To pull together without playing the blame game.  And as our forebearers before us, we can be just as patriotic by pulling together for the good of our country as well as the good of those who will come after us.

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Tomorrow is Blog Action Day with the theme of “Poverty”. Please click the link in order to go to the web site. There will be links to many blogs – not just genealogy. I urge you to go read the posts to see what everyone’s saying!

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Earlier this week, Dick Eastman announced on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter that the Washington State Digital Archives contain 74 million records that can be accessed online. You can read about the announcement here.

On Thursday, I received an email from a gal that I’ve corresponded with (as we both share ancestors in our Maple/Fuller line) from Coshocton, Ohio. She forwarded information from the Ohio Civil War list on Rootsweb that Evendon.com now has several records and books that can be searched.

Yesterday, Terry Thornton of Hill Country of Monroe County reminded me that Google Books is a very valuable resource. I’ve used it for awhile now and concur with Terry! If you haven’t searched this site for any resources related to your ancestry, I urge you to give it a try! Thanks, Terry, for the reminder about this site!

And if you who use Family Search Labs, you’ll notice that many more records have been added. Earlier this week, the site was updated and two databases – Ohio Death Records and Freedman’s Bank Records – weren’t there! They were back online Friday. Apparently, according to a response I received from my feedback email, there had been some problems with the records that needed to be fixed.

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