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Archive for August, 2011

Margaret Maple is my third great-grandmother.  She is person #5208 in my Family Tree Maker database.  My relationship to her is as follows:

  1. Margaret Maple m. George Peter Werts on September 20, 1827.
  2. Their second child and son was William Washington Werts who married Louisa Bookless on August 24, 1852.
  3. William and Louisa’s second child and first daughter, Mary Angelina Werts, married William Henry Amore on December 14, 1872.
  4. Their fourth child and third son, William Loyd Amore, married Ella Maria House on April 11, 1903.
  5. Loyd and Ella’s seventh child and fifth son is my dad.

Margaret was born to William B. Maple and Mary Fuller on December 22, 1808 in Coshocton, Ohio.  The county of Coshocton was two years away from being created by authority of the State of Ohio.  By the 1820′s it was well on its way to being a major center of commerce due to the Canal. (Ohio History Central)

Margaret was the first wife of George Peter Werts. They had eight children: Julia Ann b. June 25, 1828; William Washington b. Dec. 25, 1829; John Jackson b. Feb. 6, 1831; Susanna b. Oct. 9, 1832;  Mary Jane b. Mar. 14, 1834; Jacob Henry b. Nov. 11, 1835; Catherine Shroyer b. Apr. 30, 1838; and George Peter Wesley b. Apr. 4, 1841.   After Margaret died in Muskingum County, Ohio, on May 13, 1851, her husband married two more times.

Her parents, William B. Maple, and Mary Fuller, married on January 4, 1800 in the area that would become Coshocton County.  Both of them had come to Ohio from their birthplace of Maryland.  William was born abt July 16, 1778 and Mary was born in April 1782.  Both of them died in Peoria, Illinois.

William was the son of Jacob Maple and Elizabeth Stanford who were married in Middlesex County, New Jersey on January 27, 1769 – many years before America would fight for her independence. 

Jacob was the son of Benjamin Maple Jr.  and Sarah Clare Lee who were married in probably New Jersey.  Benjamin was born about 1696 in Burlington County, New Jersey and Sarah was born in 1700 in New Brunswick, Middlesex County, New Jersey.  It has been reported that Benjamin was the Constable for New Brunswick, New Jersey in 1728.  He on November 26, 1777 in Windsor, Middlesex County, New Jersey.

Benjamin Jr. was the son of Benjamin Maple Sr. and Elizabeth Lee who married on June 4, 1695 in Burlington, New Jersey.  He was born in 1663 in Suffolk, England and died on May 13, 1727 in New Jersey.

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Randy Seaver, of Genea-Musings, posted his SNGF via Michael John Neill’s RootDig post, 10 Signs You Have Genealogy OCD, and asked fellow geneabloggers to post their own 10 Signs of Genealogy OCD.  So here are mine:

  1. You overhear people at church, the supermarket, or standing in any line, mention they are headed to Connecticut, Michigan, Ohio, or Indiana for vacation and tell them that you have ancestors buried there.
  2. You see an ancestral name on one of your fellow geneablogger’s websites or blog and ask them for a gedcom in order to determine if you are distantly related.
  3. Your spouse asks you if you know anyone buried there each time you pass a cemetery.
  4. You check for library books that mention your ancestor’s regiment in the Civil War in hopes of finding a picture that he might be in.
  5. You read everything you can about Abraham Lincoln because the story passed down mentions that your great-grandfather shook hands with him in hopes of figuring out where, when and how that might have occured.
  6. You check familysearch.org several times a day hoping that there are new or updated databases for Ohio and Indiana.
  7. You pester your local library about getting Ancestry Library edition because your 6 month free trial from your FTM 2011 software ran out and you really only got to use it for about 30 days.
  8. You schedule your Friday nights around “Who Do You Think You Are?” when they have new shows.
  9. Your family knows your genealogy “happy dance” all too well and scatter before you can tell them why you are excited and what new information you’ve found.
  10. The only genealogy information your family wants to hear about is when there are scandals involved – and the closer the ancestor – the better!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this – have you seen yourself in any of mine?

 

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